The Eighth Air Force Historical Society
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Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for February 2017

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

 

 

Co-Pilot of the B-17 “Ghost Ship”, Osborn Stone, Gives up his Ghost

Found perfectly ditched in a Belgium field by the British with engines still running, but without the crew, The B-17 of the 324th Squadron was quickly dubbed a Ghost Ship in the Stars and Stripes.

http://www.eagletribune.com/revisting-the-ghost-ship/article_e2c5ff4d-f95f-51c0-a89e-5bb3df90ef9b.html

2016 Annotated version of Mein Kamp is now a Bestseller in Germany

With the Copyright expired, it could be published and the initial run of 3,500 quickly sold out. 85,000 copies have now been sold.

http://www.aol.com/article/news/2017/01/08/hitler-s-manifesto-mein-kampf-tops-germany-s-bestseller-list/21650215/

Aboard the USS North Carolina – at Cape Fear River in Wilmington, North Carolina

For $14 you can do a self-walking tour aboard the battleship, and it is much easier to get to it than the USS Missouri in Oahu.

http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865670585/75-years-after-World-War-II-the-Showboat-still-has-many-stories-to-tell.html

When does Close Air Support really become Close Air Support?

CAS started as we know it now during the 1930s. The USAAF during that time wanted strategic heavy bomber efforts, and CAS was initially given to P39 Aircobra, P40 Tomahawk and P-51 Mustang before being almost exclusively given to P-47s in the ETO. Modern CAS training employment has been extensive – but you hardly hear of it. Common talk still espouses the WW II era Strategic use of air – but in fact CAS is way more prevalent in actual use.

https://warontherocks.com/2017/01/clash-of-clans-the-air-force-can-never-deliver-enough-close-air-support-for-the-army/

Beirne Lay, CO of the 487 BG, writing about Bailing out of his B-24

Some people have a real knack for writing and “putting you there”. One reason why he became such a good Hollywood screenwriter.

He publish his book, I’ve Had It: The Survival of a Bomb Group Commander, in 1945

 

http://www.airspacemag.com/daily-planet/free-fall-above-burning-b-24-180961719/

NAZI National Sponsoring of “Research” to Support “The Jewish Question” in WW II

In order to get people to believe in any NAZI goal, the NAZI officials created official foundations and research organizations to create and publish research to justify their goals. They created these in many countries outside of Germany too.

(Editor’s note: this style of research funding still goes on in many governments on a variety of topics.)

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2017/01/16/hitp-j16.html

 

Clare Hollingworth – The Reporter who reported the start of WW II Dead at 105


Sent on assignment to Poland in August of 1939, she actually traveled by car through the German Army assembly areas in Eastern Germany in August before arriving in Poland. Then on September 1, 1939, she was able to telephone to the world that Germany had invaded Poland after seeing the invasion first hand. She died at the Age of 105.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/clare-hollingworth-reporter-who-broke-news-about-start-of-world-war-ii-dies-at-105/2017/01/10/6aa9ca72-d73f-11e6-b8b2-cb5164beba6b_story.html?utm_term=.deeab7c30dec

 

US Propaganda Though Cartoons in WW II

WW II was a nationwide effort – and everyone participated. Movies, and cartoons, help focus people on the war all the time.

 

Dr Seuss: http://www.insidethemagic.net/2017/01/influencing-america-through-animation-wwii-propaganda-cartoons-part-one-dr-seuss/

Looney toon Cartoons: http://www.insidethemagic.net/2017/01/influencing-america-through-animation-wwii-propaganda-cartoons-part-two-looney-tunes/

An on a humorous note, the 1943 cartoon with Donald Duck “Der Fuehrer’s Face” is no longer banned in Russia. The song won an Academy Award. Their court initially did not realize the cartoon, made is the USA, was satire.

http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-curious-case-of-the-russian-ban-of-a-donald-duck-cartoon

 

Emigrating out of Germany in 1939 with his parents – Hans G. Reif returned as an Infantryman in 1945

His dad was a doctor and he insisted that they all leave to the USA in 1938 – and since he had a valuable skill, he was one of very few allowed into the USA.

https://buffalonews.com/2017/01/15/11617-salute-hans-g-reif-photo-12116-688-4419-jewish-vet-witnessed-dachau-horrors/

 

The US M3 “Grant” Tank in Soviet and Allied Forces

The Russian nickname for the tank: "A Grave for Six Brothers".

As a  stop-gap tank, it was a better than having no tank at all - barely.

http://nationalinterest.org/blog/the-buzz/the-m-3-grant-americas-nazi-germany-tank-killer-19126

 

A Note on a Tree Saying “The War is Over”

Michael A. Altieri Sr never had to shoot his M1 at the enemy – they were retreating faster than they could advance.

On May 8, 1945 he saw a note on a tree saying the war in Europe was over, he still has it.

https://buffalonews.com/2017/01/22/salute-12317-altieri-836-1329-foto-14-wwii-vet-kept-camp-notice-announcing-end-war/

 

Boer War Victoria Cross Recipient’s Pistol Donated to Museum

Sir Neville Howse’s service pistol will be displayed in the museum. [Since no one is allowed to have any weapons in that Country, I am surprised they did no arrest, put in jail and destroy the pistol since no one in Australia is allowed to have any weapons.]

 

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-11-25/historic-pistol-donated-to-australian-war-memorial/8058102

 

Christmas Truce Officer Lieutenant Colonel Frank Naden’s medals Up for Auction

Playing football on Christmas day during WW I with the Germans is now generally known.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3964540/Bravery-medals-including-two-military-crosses-awarded-WWI-hero-took-famous-Christmas-Day-truce-sale-10-000.html

 

Robert Fulton and Torpedo’s of the Navy – in 1812

The technology was not there – but the idea was.

 

http://thehillishome.com/2016/11/lost-capitol-hill-robert-fulton-at-the-washington-navy-yard/

 

The first plane to Engage the Japanese Navy on Dec 7 – Flies out of Bellingham Washington

It was an Interstate Cadet: a two-seat, single-engine trainer. Instructor Cornelia Fort and her student were flying out of John Rodgers Field – now Kalaeola Airport – west of Honolulu, when they were attacked by a Japanese warplane.

 

http://www.bellinghamherald.com/news/local/article119295643.html#storylink=cpy

 

Bailing out of the B-17 “Man O’ War”

Captured twice by the Germans, John Katsaros escaped twice when the Resistance raided the prisons he was in, walked through France and into Spain – a screenwriter could not have written his true life adventure.

 

http://www.eagletribune.com/news/haverhill/you-needed-a-lot-of-luck/article_19f2b09d-c3cc-51db-b866-9cf44eb2db4b.html

 

Double Trouble - Nose art at EAA Museum

The further away the aircraft were – the more revealing the nose art was. Lt. Clement Tromblay flew the plane - and now his son can see the artwork.

 

http://www.wisn.com/article/man-finds-grandfathers-world-war-ii-bomber-at-nose-art-exhibit/8509095

 

Shot Down in 1944 – Identified in 2016

 

The Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency said in a press release Monday that Capt. Albert Schlegel of Cleveland was identified based on laboratory analysis and circumstantial evidence.

 

Captured in Fall of 1944 – it was surmised he was killed by local Gestapo agents.

 

http://www.omaha.com/news/military/offutt-lab-identifies-remains-of-wwii-fighter-pilot-who-disappeared/article_5ba084af-dd74-54e9-a903-6df395db0d83.html

 

Calvary in 1914 - Last Stand at Zandewoorde

Unlike in the movie “War Horse” British Calvary did not blindly charge into machine guns. This is a book about one such unit.

 

http://www.militarymodelling.com/news/article/last-stand-at-zandvoorde-1914/24555

 

The War Against the Barbary Pirates

 

Before the War of 1812 there was the war that help create the US Navy and gave the marines a phrase in their song.

 

Book review: http://www.navyhistory.org/2016/01/book-review-thomas-jefferson-and-the-tripoli-pirates-the-forgotten-war-that-changed-american-history/

 

 

Amazon link: Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates: The Forgotten War That Changed American History by Brian Kilmeade (2015-11-03)https://ir-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/ir?t=tomphilophoto-20&l=am2&o=1&a=B017V8GE9O

 

Tinker AFB at 75

 

They have an article about the base and its heritage in B-24 combat modification. There are errors in the article about the Ploesti raid.

 

https://www.dvidshub.net/news/220980/tinker-celebrates-75-years-consolidated-b-24-liberator-aircraft-profile

 

 

Operation Tidal Wave was a single mission flown from Benghazi with 5 b-24 groups - 2 from the 8th and the other 3 from the (then) 12th AF. They lost 55 a/c. Only after southern Italy was captured did the 15th AF start raids against Ploesti oil refineries.

 

26 Medals in Yorkshire

Starting at the age of 15 during the Boer War,  Thomas Patrick Carney’s 26 medals are now on display at the York Army Museum. May not be the most, but they are all due to combat.

 

http://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/most-decorated-soldier-s-medals-return-home-to-yorkshire-1-8345382

 

 

                           

Memphis Belle to go on display at Air Force Museum in 2018

 

After a full restoration, the famous Belle will be on display again.

 

http://www.daytondailynews.com/news/local/memphis-belle-display-air-force-museum-2018/xkJg6sCmeIi4qYR4Nk96WI/

 

 

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for July 2015

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

Comment: What If the Allies had lost World War I?

A Commentary on the entry of the US in WW I and how those reasons are still valid and reverberate even now in the US role in the world.

 http://www.sbs.com.au/news/article/2015/06/05/comment-what-if-allies-had-lost-world-war-i

 Vintage WW I Posters and Artwork Up for Auction

 A collection of about 2,000 posters from the World War One era, considered to be one of the world's finest and amassed over more than a decade by a U.S. Army officer, will be sold at auction later this month, Guernsey's auction house said on Tuesday.

 His heirs are selling them off. They are from various countries.

 http://www.ibtimes.com/uncle-sam-wants-you-rare-world-war-i-posters-auction-1959757

 Actor and WW II Veteran Christopher Lee Dead at 93

 He was in the RAF as Cipher decrypter, and in the LRDG – Long Range Desert Group – in North Africa leading raids behind German lines.\

 

“When pressed by an eager interviewer on his SAS past, he leaned forward and whispered: “Can you keep a secret?”

“Yes!” the interviewer replied, breathless with excitement.

“So can I.” replied a smiling Lee, sitting back in his chair.”

 His whole British military dossier is still classified.

 http://forces.tv/60797077

 

 The European Alliance System After Waterloo

How Otto Bismarck’s system was created then broke down over 70 years which led to the resulting Entente vs Allied alliance spheres of battle in WW I.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joseph-v-micallef/this-week-in-world-war-i_b_7617188.html

 

Wonder Bread Wins the War 

How WW II created the need to enrich “white” bread to restore the vitamins that were accidentally eliminated from the bread when making it white.

 https://www.yahoo.com/food/white-bread-will-we-miss-it-121847552463.html

 Recovering a B-25 from the Alaska Tundra

 A “lend-Lease” B-25 destined for the USSR never made it – but it is now being recovered for the Warbirds Of Glory Museum in Brighton, Michigan.

 http://www.alaskapublic.org/2015/07/06/historic-wwii-bomber-recovered-in-nome-offers-russian-twist-to-iconic-american-plane/

 Local Oregon News

Guns and Guacamole July 18, 2015

Want to help out a local museum AND get to fire the main gun of an M3 Stuart WW II Tank – among other weapons?  Go to the Oregon Military Museum Fundraiser on July 18 from 10 AM to 1:30. Purchase your firing slot and weapons of choice (some fully automatic like the BAR, Thompson) at: https://www.tickettomato.com/event_group/109/guns-and-guacamole/

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is August 8, 2015

Remaining Dates in 2015 are August 8 and November 7h

 Food for the Meeting

 The August food menu is a sandwich type meal will be available at the Beaverton Elks lodge. ONLY if you are planning to eat contact Tom Philo via email at secretary@8thafhsoregon.com or phone him at 503-591-3227 – again ONLY if you are planning to purchase a meal.

 Prior Programs

·        May 2015 – Henry Bendinelli Navigator in C-46s in WWII  & Photo Recon pilot of  B-26s over Korea.

·        February 2015 – Alice Miller Women Flight Uniforms

·        November  2014 - Salute to Veterans

·        August – 2014 Dick Foy and Air Tanker Operations w/ WWII Aircraft

·        May 2014 – Multiple presentations

·        February  2014 - Beauty and Brains – Women in the Military

·        November  2013 Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

·        August 2013 -  Frank LaSage – PTs in the Med

·        May 2013 - Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

·        February  2013 - Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

·        May 2013 – Jack Cramer B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse” in the Pacific

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents. 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for June 2015

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 Shoes of the Luftwaffe?

 In a bizarre twist, a batch of women's sandals was recently seized from a shop in the city of Voronezh after activists complained the pattern on them resembled the Luftwaffe chevron.

 

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-32590494

 Prayer Book Flies Home

 At 24,000 feet somewhere between Italy and Germany Larry Hilte’s prayer book fell out of his pocket and into NZAI occupied Europe in 1945 form his B-24J Liberator (late model J versions could rarely fly above 24,000 feet with a full load, the D version could get to 30,000 since it had less armor, less guns, and less crew). 

A person visiting Bastogne found it in an antique shop and returned it to Larry in the USA.

 http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-county/towson/ph-tt-wwii-prayer-book-0520-20150518-story.html

Rails and WW I – The Great War Would Not Been Possible Without the Railroads

 The amount of troops mobilized – AND MOVED – during the first month of war in August 1914 is truly staggering.

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/massive-rail-networks-made-world-war-i-possible-50580fe5994

 Germany Agrees to pay former Soviet POWS

There are only around 4,000 left alive today – out of the roughly 5 million USSR soldiers who arrived at POWs camps during WW II.  Each one will be given approximately $2,700 US.

 Soviet POWs who survived were sent to Soviet camps afterwards – all captured soldiers Stalin considered traitors thus they were punished again and around 20% died in Soviet camps after the war.

http://www.wsj.com/articles/germany-to-pay-compensation-to-soviet-prisoners-from-world-war-ii-1432148797

A Hard Drinking Womanizing Spy in Japan Help Save THE USSR

 In a bookstore in Japan a letter addressed to Richard Sorge was discovered signed by Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop. Just another part of deception that this Soviet Agent had built around himself to hide his real goal of providing military intelligence to the USSR.

 Note: in 1943 before he was hanged there was an offer to trade him for Japanese that the Soviet Union had in prison – Stalin – who had a photographic memory for details and people – lied that he did not know him and let him be hung – even though he was given detailed reports citing his estimates by name from 1937 onwards. Mainly because he told Stalin that Germany would attack, and what date (he was off by 2 weeks days due to Germany not being ready as originally planned) and if he came by it would be known that Stalin was warned of the attack and did nothing – Stalin could never be shown to be wrong if you wanted to stay alive.

http://www.registercitizen.com/general-news/20150520/alcoholic-womanizing-german-double-agent-helped-turn-tide-of-world-war-ii

 Chessboard Battle: USSR vs NAZI Germany

 Discovered in a hotel shop Simon Wiesenthal Center wrote to the Russian Prosecutor to complain both about “Nesting” dolls painted with typical 1930s style Jewish stereotype drawings as often seen in Germany in that era but also about a chess set where the pieces are of Joseph Stalin and Adolf Hitler as the main pieces.

 http://www.jpost.com/Diaspora/Holiday-Inn-Hilton-hotels-allegedly-caught-selling-anti-Semitic-Nazi-items-in-Moscow-403515

 US Army Air Corps General Frank Andrews – A General Few Knew About

 Killed in May of 1943 in Greenland while flying back to the USA, he set the interwar framework of the Army Air Forces and was in charge of the 8th Air Force in WW II.  This article is a concise biography of this Army Aviation General.

http://news.investors.com/052115-753743-frank-andrews-developed-ww2-bombers.htm?ven=yahoocp&src=aurlled&ven=yahoo

 Shadow War - Night fighters and Electronic Warfare in WWII

 War pushes both men and creativity to higher levels – and war – regardless of era – created the requirement to come up with either better or new ways to defeat the enemy.  During WW II the art of Electronic warfare went from nothing to extremely effective. It went from using eyes to see an airplane to radar in a plane spotting enemy aircraft up to 20 miles away the sky at night to creating a whole invasion fleet on enemy radar screens.

 http://www.dailykos.com/story/2015/05/14/1381380/-Shadow-War-Night-fighters-and-electronic-warfare-in-WWII?detail=hide#

Two from WW I to get MOH

 There are actually 3 current different designs for the MOH: Army, Navy, & Air Force each have their own unique version.
http://www.kcci.com/politics/two-from-world-war-i-to-get-medal-of-honor/33045252

Pershing Park in Washington D.C. is a "World War I Memorial"

Congress passed a law in December of 2014 making it a memorial. Now the Park Service is accepting public comments on what to do.
http://www.nationalparkstraveler.com/2015/05/national-park-service-considering-national-world-war-i-memorial-national-mall26636

WW I Eastern Front: Mobile Warfare (along the railroad lines anyway) 

Unlike the western or Italian front, the Eastern Front was never really static for more than a few months at a time. Hundreds of miles were won and lost during the fighting. Germany at one point nearly got to Minsk.

https://www.stratfor.com/analysis/world-war-i-retrospective-challenges-eastern-front

Six Weeks of Technology that Changed Combat in WW I

There were lots of technical innovations, and the emergence of dedicated staff officers, that affected how the war was fought.

 During one 6 week period in 1915 saw the rise of three major innovations that dramatically affected combat around the whole world.

http://www.npr.org/2015/05/07/404994238/six-weeks-in-world-war-i-transformed-how-wars-are-fought

US Industry and WW II – Production Won the War

Two items win wars: people and equipment – you need both. The USA supplied enormous amount of equipment to the Allies during the peak of the war. Some Allies, such as England, actually were running out of people in late 1944 (they disbanded some divisions due to lack of infantry) while the Soviet Union did not run out since as they re-conquered territory they forcibly drafted the people still there into the Red Army. However, the Red Army mainly moved on USA army vehicles– specifically - Studebaker – due to US sending wartime production via lend lease to them via Iran. Almost all Soviet factories had been converted to tank production – and forgot about an armored infantry needs trucks in order to become mobile.

The US contribution to the Soviet war effort was critical from late 1942 to late 1943 due to Soviet factories still being re-built and re-organized after their 1942 relocation. There even is a Soviet film that shows off US made Soviet uniforms and LOTS of US food rations in 1943.

From 1944 onwards increased production within the USSR shifted percentages (which is what statistics is so dangers to quote) so that US contribution shrunk from around 40% of all items to less than 10% of total production in 1944/45.

One advantage that the US had was that total industrial capacity was only around 60% before the war. Idle or low utilization factories could be put back into full use in a very short time – and new ones quickly built (mainly ammunition). Willow Run only took two years to build -including a 4 lane highway to it before the first B-24 came out.

We have no idle or even spare capacity factories anymore.

http://www.bendbulletin.com/opinion/3155876-151/column-world-war-ii-would-have-been-lost#

Sabre vs. Mig – What was the real Ratio – It Depends

Jet vs. jet combat over Korea was new for both sides. The speed differences and the different styles of planes placed challenges for both sides. A new book out from osprey is about this conflict.

http://nationalinterest.org/feature/cold-war-battle-the-sky-f-86-saber-vs-mig-15-12909

Military Animals of WW I – Dogs, Cats, Birds, Monkeys & More

There are some famous animals of WW I – the best one known in the US (when they taught history anyway in US schools) is the pigeon Cher Ami that saved the “Lost battalion” of the 77th Division in WW I from being destroyed by US artillery.

However, there are many other famous animals that served throughout the war – and were given actual military rank – with pensions – at the end.

ANZACs had thbir own hero from Gallipoli: Simpson and his donkey.

http://www.news.com.au/national/anzac-day/john-simpson-kirkpatrick-the-donkey-leading-pom-with-a-possum-who-became-our-national-hero/story-fnmewwpe-1227356165128

http://www.news.com.au/national/anzac-day/sergeant-stubby-the-spycatcher-and-the-hero-animals-of-world-war-i/story-fnmewwpe-1227358897998

P-38 Pilot Roane Sias – Shot Down and 2 time POW Escapee

As a Lt flying in P-38 Lightnings over Italy in the 94th “Hat in the Ring” squadron in WW II he was jumped by 109s and shot down on August 20th 1943. During the next 7 months he was captured, escaped, captured and escaped again before gaining allied lines.

He died recently at the age of 92.

http://www.marinij.com/obituaries/20150518/marin-war-hero-roane-sias-who-escaped-nazi-captors-twice-dies-at-92

3D Printing and Bailing of a B-25

Not many tail gunners in a B-25 actually rode on the outside of their plane  on the elevator – but Russell Scott did just that over Italy in 1944.

http://3dprint.com/66083/ww-ii-veterans-3d-print/

A Hero’s Walk: The World War II Journey of Lt. B.B. Darnell

Is a new book published via Amazon about Lt B.B. Darnell and his combat in Italy during WW II.

http://www.oanow.com/news/lee_county/article_444848be-fd15-11e4-9123-8f0959708609.html

Sally B – Leads VE Day Show at Duxford

Over the May 23-24 weekend you will see this B-17 lead a mass formation flyover at Duxford, England.

“IWM Duxford's VE Day Anniversary Air Show will be the only opportunity to see the VE Day salute led by B-17 Sally B and the first time in 21 years that Sally B has led a mass formation of aircraft. This moving spectacle will be presented in honour of the 70th anniversary of VE Day, Sally B's own 70th anniversary and the 40th anniversary of the aircraft's long association with IWM Duxford.”

http://www.hertsandessexobserver.co.uk/B-17-Flying-Fortress-Sally-B-leads-poignant/story-26478811-detail/story.html

Graveyard of Plane on the Ocean Floor – Lend Lease Style

A scuba diver found over 150 planes on the ocean floor 150 feet down off of Roi-Namur.

At the end of the war the Lend Lease agreement the USA had with foreign governments was that countries had to pay for the planes they kept, return the planes (and they had to pay shipping back to the USA), or get rid of them. Almost every country just blew them up or in the case when in The Pacific – threw them overboard.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3073254/Stunning-pictures-reveal-hundreds-World-War-Two-aircraft-lost-70-YEARS-Pacific-Ocean-seabed.html

New Movie about the USS Indianapolis to be Filmed

The World War II battleship disaster flick "USS Indianapolis: Men of Courage,"directed by Mario Van Peebles and starring Nicolas Cage, will start filming in Mobile, Alabama, in June.

http://www.al.com/entertainment/index.ssf/2015/05/extras_casting.html

New Documentary about the Doolittle Raid

Retired Air Force Lt. Col. Richard Cole, original B-25 co-pilot for General “Jimmy” Doolittle during the mission to Japan, was at the premier of a new documentary called: "Doolittle's Raiders: A Final Toast”.

The only other living survivor of the mission is Staff Sgt. David Thatcher.

http://www.airforcetimes.com/story/entertainment/2015/05/19/doolittle-raid-documentary-world-war-two-richard-cole/27589483/

Bad Eyes, Good Shot – VF-2 Pilot Mike Wolf with 7 Victories in the Pacific

Another way to pass the initial flight exam in 1942 – go when it is busy.

“Wolf was about to get his eyes tested when the doctor was called away.  When he came back, he said, ‘Didn't I already examine your eyes?' I said, ‘Yes, sir,’ “

And into the Navy pilot school he went.

http://www.kitsapsun.com/news/wwii-ace-pilot-to-be-honored-in-dc_40919696

Two more Tuskegee Airmen Gone

On January 5, 2015 two airmen, both living in LA, died on the same day. Clarence E. Huntley and Joseph Shambrey, both were 91 years old. They enlisted in 1942 and eventually saw combat in WW II in the MTO – Mediterranean Theatre of Operations. They were in the 100th Fighter Squadron, 332nd Fighter Group as mechanics.

Oregon Military Museum

Oregon Military Museum Foundation, www.ormilmuseum.org, is outside of Portland in Clackamas County off of highway 212 – 234 at Camp Wihycombe. It has a lot of unique items, including running Japanese, & American tanks, and lots of Oregon military related historical equipment of Oregon National Guard and regular military personnel from Oregon.

Fir-Sat 9 to 5 PM only. Other times by appointment. 

They have slowly been getting a new, museum standard, building instead of the WW I building they have been housed in.

Olympic Air Museum

At the Olympic Regional Airport this houses not only WW II era but modern era aircraft. And you can book rides on some of them.

$5 admission. 11 to 5 daily.

www.olympicflightmuseum.com

American Air Museum Re-building their main Building

If you go to Duxford and visit that excellent operating airfield / museum you will see the AAM there. It is an “artsy” building that is mainly un-functional for viewing airplanes – each plane gets in the way of others - even though it was designed for being an aircraft museum. You really cannot really see aircraft due to the way it was designed. So they are taking all the aircraft out and redoing the building.

www.americanairmuseum.com

Antietam Battle Map for you Smart Phone

www.civilwar.org has created an interactive battlefield map for the Battle of Antietam which occurred in 1862.  So far they have 5 interactive maps to download: Antietam, Bull Run, Brandy Station, Gettysburg, & Petersburg.www.civilwar.org/battleapps

Wooden Boats and Iron Men – PT-658

This is the only fully operational PT boat in the USA. It is here in Portland, Oregon. They have had it going 43 knots along the Willamette during Coast Guard tests. On one engine, at idle, it goes 8 knots.

“Give me a fast ship for I intend to go in harm’s way” – John Paul Jones.

www.pt658heritage.org

B-17 Lacey Lady to Salem

The B-17, which for 67 years sat above the fuel tanks at The Bomber gas station in Milwaukie Oregon, has now been moved to Salem for a full restoration at McNary Airfield.

Warbirds Over The West on June 13, 2015 will be held at the airfield as a fundraiser. Seewww.b17alliancegroup.com   for details.

Local Oregon News

Guns and Guacamole July 18, 2015

Want to help out a local museum AND get to fire the main gun of an M3 Stuart WW II Tank – among other weapons?  Go to the Oregon Military Museum Fundraiser on July 18 from 10 AM to 1:30. Purchase your firing slot and weapons of choice (some fully automatic like the BAR, Thompson) at: https://www.tickettomato.com/event_group/109/guns-and-guacamole/

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is August 8, 2015

Remaining Dates in 2015 are August 8 and November 7h

 

Food for the Meeting

The August food menu is a sandwich type meal will be available at the Beaverton Elks lodge. ONLY if you are planning to eat contact Tom Philo via email at secretary@8thafhsoregon.com or phone him at 503-591-3227 – again ONLY if you are planning to purchase a meal.

Prior Programs

·        May 2015 – Henry Bendinelli Navigator in C-46s in WWII  & Photo Recon pilot of  B-26s over Korea.

·        February 2015 – Alice Miller Women Flight Uniforms

·        November  2014 - Salute to Veterans

·        August – 2014 Dick Foy and Air Tanker Operations w/ WWII Aircraft

·        May 2014 – Multiple presentations

·        February  2014 - Beauty and Brains – Women in the Military

·        November  2013 Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

·        August 2013 -  Frank LaSage – PTs in the Med

·        May 2013 - Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

·        February  2013 - Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

·        May 2013 – Jack Cramer B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse” in the Pacific

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

 

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents. 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for May 2015

 

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

“Kilroy was Here” – WW I style

 Well back from the front lines in France are the caves of Naours, where during WW I soldiers would go sightseeing underground and leave their names on the walls.

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/world-war-i-soldiers-graffiti-found-in-france/

One Month at War

At 15 years old, right after the Allied bombing of Dresden in February 1945, Diether Warneck joined the Wehrmacht and was in combat for a month. His son made a movie about the one month of time at war his father fought in WW II.

He is now raising money to pay the entrance fees to film festivals.

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/help-make-this-documentary-about-a-german-soldier-during-world-war-ii-a-reality-7ece7751b954

Generation War

A German TV series – in 3 parts – it shows the life of 5 people from spring of 1941 till the end of the war – from their perspective of trying to just survive the war.

Streams on NetFlix

https://medium.com/war-is-boring/everyone-loses-in-germanys-devastating-world-war-ii-epic-5930012726d1

Retro TV Adds Two Crusades to its Lineup

The original Crusade in Europe , based on General Eisenhower’s book, is joined by the Crusade in The Pacific, on its network.

http://www.chattanoogan.com/2015/4/9/297850/Retro-TV-Adds-Crusade-In-Europe-And.aspx

Strudel Saved his Life

Staying alive during WW II was often a matter of luck – especially if you were Jewish.  Ernie Feld loved sweets as a kid – so he was sent off to baking school before the war. While on a labor detail an SS Officer heard of his cooking prowess and was recruited to cook for them – and he survived the war because of it.

http://www.latimes.com/nation/la-na-nazi-baker-20150416-story.html

Holocaust Selfies & Tattoos

Selfies are everywhere – but on Holocaust Remembrance day people take them at the concentration camps; with those that actually lived through it; and with a temporary tattoo of a real ID number that a person was given – or a permanent tattoo of a relative that lived through it.

Note: the number that was assigned was not just a number – their own unique punch card went with the person wherever they were sent for work details, factories or to other camps. On the card were their personal details along with their assigned number so that they could select people based on the information sorted within the punch card.

The German Railroad relied heavily on punch cards to track and route cars and trains throughout Germany.

http://www.haaretz.com/jewish-world/holocaust-remembrance-day/.premium-1.652068

Filming in Combat in the USSR during WW II

http://rbth.com/business/2015/04/22/filming_the_war_on_the_eastern_front_the_memories_of_a_soviet_camera_45397.html

 

Aerial Bombardment and Hitting The Broad Side Of A Barn

The Butts Report, a study of RAF bombing in June / July 1941 showed that night missions were largely useless: “. . . of those aircraft recorded as attacking their target, only one in three got within five miles.” In fact, only one in ten bombers that attacked targets in the German industrial area of the Ruhr got within five miles of their target.

http://warontherocks.com/2015/04/warchives-aerial-bombardment-and-hitting-the-broad-side-of-a-barn/

Main Web Site: http://warontherocks.com/

A Coke for Zhukov

A morale booster for all sides during WW II, it was prohibited in the USSR due to it being a western product. However, it could be obtained if you asked for it in a different way for one Soviet General.

http://www.ozy.com/flashback/coke-made-especially-for-a-communist/41336

Maginot Line – Victim of Success?

Most people look at the Maginot Line of WW II France as a failure – but it actually worked and diverted the Germans to make a longer line of march to get to Paris – which in turn would give the French more time to counter the military moves.

The Germans used same basic tactics in WW II as WW I – but had higher mobility and could concentrate forces more than in WW. They there had more opportunity to defeat the French Army in running battles. The French command structure could not react effectively due to radio, tactical, doctrine and operational methods that had not been updated when compared to the Germans.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-story-of-the-maginot-line-2015-4

May 8 1945 remembered May 8 2015 – 70 years later

It is remembered and honored more in the former Soviet Union States and the nations that were physically occupied in Europe than elsewhere.

The Life of A Lucky Solider

Pavel Markovich was in school on a field trip in June of 1941 outside Minsk. It took 3 days before they realized something was wrong and thus his adventure began.

http://rbth.com/arts/2015/04/19/when_the_war_came_how_one_soviet_jew_survived_wwii_against_the_odds_45345.html

306 BG (H) Pilot 1st Lt. Clayton A. Nattier gets his POW Medal

After putting in the required paperwork last year he went to Buckley Air Force Base to have his POW medal presented to him. He actually earned it by bailing out of his crippled B-17 Flying Fortress over Germany in 1944.

http://www.afrc.af.mil/News/ArticleDisplay/tabid/136/Article/586569/wwii-ex-pow-receives-medals-thanks-arpc.aspx

WW II Polish Resistance Fighter W. Bartoszewski Dies at 93

He fought in the defense of Warsaw in 1939, rounded up in a street sweep in 1940 and sent to Auschwitz and given number 4422.  He was then RELEASED in 1941 after the Red Cross intervened on his behalf, as he was Catholic and not Jewish, then fought again in 1944, then imprisoned again by the Communists for 7 years after the war – since he fought as part of the Home Guard and not for the communists – who refused to fight the Germans in 1944 Warsaw Uprising.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/w-bartoszewski-resistance-fighter-and-polish-foreign-minister-dies-at-93/2015/04/27/812c4df6-ecf4-11e4-8666-a1d756d0218e_story.html

Need a WW I Pilot Uniform?

If you have a few grand, like 5 and a ½, you can own Quentin Roosevelt’s WW I pilots’ uniform.

http://www.ima-usa.com/original-u-s-wwi-army-air-service-aviator-quentin-roosevelt-uniform-set-son-of-president-theodore-roosevelt.html?trk_msg=8H9C79GRI94471HF2D1IHHV77C&trk_contact=KBPVJUHGUT71LL7TER4DU1E5FS&trk_module=arm&utm_source=Listrak&utm_medium=Email&utm_term=Product&utm_campaign=20150425&utm_content=20150425

June 26/27, 1876

Here is a good narrative with photos to complement on the Battle of the Little Big Horn with General George Armstrong Custer and the 7th Calvary.

http://www.friendslittlebighorn.com/custerslaststand.htm

 May 9, 2015  Program

Henry Bendinelli was an aerial navigator in the 9th Air Force. He flew in the C-46 Curtiss Commando transports while in the ETO. Of course transports were always armed – if you pulled out your COLT .45 and shot at enemy planes.

During Korean War he was a Navigator in Douglas A-26s. After that war he was stationed at Portland and also flew in CH-47 Chinook helicopters.

 Food for the Meeting

The May food menu is a sandwich type meal will be available at the Beaverton Elks lodge. ONLY if you are planning to eat contact Tom Philo via email at secretary@8thafhsoregon.com or phone him at 503-591-3227 – again ONLY if you are planning to purchase a meal.

 Prior Programs

·        February 2015 – Alice Miller Women Flight Uniforms

·        November  2014 - Salute to Veterans

·        August – 2014 Dick Foy and Air Tanker Operations w/ WWII Aircraft

·        May 2014 – Multiple presentations

·        February  2014 - Beauty and Brains – Women in the Military

·        November  2013 Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

·        August 2013 -  Frank LaSage – PTs in the Med

·        May 2013 - Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

·        February  2013 - Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

·        May 2013 – Jack Cramer B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse” in the Pacific

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

 

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

 

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for November 2014

Need A HA-1111 (Spanish built Bf-109G2)?

If you can meet his price, no negotiation at all, Wilson Connell “Connie” Edwards will sell you one of the six he has stored in his hanger in Texas.

http://www.aopa.org/News-and-Video/All-News/2014/August/Pilot/f_talltale#ooid=lwZjZxbjrzIBvgvvUWoGxKdLpchtvA5z

Color Snapshots of Berlin in 1956

Found recently at a flea market, the images in this article date from 1956-7 and were taken by a US Serviceman in Berlin.

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/9970780316/cold-war-camera-1950s-berlin-in-color?slide=14

 

ID American 8th AF Crewmen from Photos

 

Britain's American Air Museum which is part of Britain's Imperial War Museum, seeks help identifying US personnel, has launched a new wiki-style website designed to allow members of the public to help identify the service men and women depicted in the site's online galleries. Based on 15,000 prints from The Roger Freeman Collection documenting the lives of the US Army Air Forces personnel who served in England during the Second World War, the site records the thoughts and memories of the local population who worked and lived alongside them.

http://www.dpreview.com/articles/4491297425/american-air-museum-seeks-help-identifying-us-personnel-who-served-in-uk?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=related-news&utm_medium=image&ref=related-news

Reunion at Mighty 8th AF Museum

 At least 60 veterans were there at the annual reunion.

http://savannahnow.com/news/2013-07-24/world-war-ii-veterans-8th-air-force-commemorate-mighty-eighths-b-17

 

Short History of the IL-2

 Research started in 1939 on this famous Soviet close air support aircraft and it fought from the first day to the last day of WW II.

“The pilots crucially believed in the resilience of their aircraft. In one well-documented incident during final deployment preparations, the young son of one pilot asked the commander whether his father would be killed at the front.

The officer, Captain Konstantin Kholobayev, drew his service pistol and fired from close range at the metal casing around the Il-2’s cockpit. Apart from a chip in the paint, the round left no trace on the surface. The psychological effect of this action, as the captain noted later, was directed not so much at the child as the pilot.”

http://in.rbth.com/economics/2014/10/07/the_evolution_of_the_ilyushin_il-2_38835.html

 

Flying For the RFC (RAF) In WW I

India had 1.3 million soldiers fighting within the British Empire in WW I – but very few ever made it to flying status. The very first one joined the French air-force as a British Subject to become a pilot - since the British refused to let him join the RFC. Only after word reached the head of the RFC of what people would think when a British subject had to join a French squadron in order to fight the Germans on the Western Front did they allow Indians to join the RCF.

 http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Indians-who-lorded-over-European-skies-in-WWI/articleshow/44717029.cms

Two Oscars and A Wellington in Lake Loktak

 

Historians have identified the planes in lake Loktak as those of two Japanese “Oscar” fighters that were shot down by a British Wellington heavy bomber before it was shot down by another “Oscar” on June 17, 1944.

 http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/india/Wreckage-sites-of-3-WW-II-fighter-planes-at-Loktak-Lake-identified/articleshow/44672588.cms

Benito Mussolini’s Air Raid Shelter Opens for Tours

Build in a hurry in 1940 once Italy declared war on France and England inside a wine cellar, it is now open for tourists.

The tour opens to the public Oct. 31. The includes a separate underground bunker that was later built for Mussolini directly under the villa.

http://articles.economictimes.indiatimes.com/2014-10-26/news/55446675_1_mussolini-family-villa-torlonia-wine-cellar

Canadian Aces of WW I

Out of the top 10 aces of the war – on any side – 2 were Canadian. Billy Bishop, and Raymond Collishaw. Based on the Canadian population and the number of people involved in the war, there should have been 0 in the top 10 list.

Collishaw stayed in the RAF after WW I and actually fought in Russia in 1919. He retired in 1943. (USA, Britain, and other nations, fought against the Bolsheviks in northern Russia in 1918 and 1919 after Lenin had signed the treaty of Brest-Litvosk in late 1917 ending Russia’s involvement in WW I.)

http://ww1.canada.com/battlefront/canada-spawned-many-of-first-world-wars-greatest-aces

 

15 British Soldiers from WW I ID’d and Officially Buried at

Bois-Grenier

Discovered 5 years ago in a northern French field, modern DNA analysis was able to find relatives and then determine their real names from the list of missing soliders.

http://ww1.canada.com/after-the-war/images-15-british-soldiers-from-the-first-world-war-are-reburied-in-france

 

WW II Soviet Soldiers – Retired in the US

The Soviet Union was not hesitant to get every person working toward victory – both in the factories or at the front. This was one time where your religion did not matter – as long as you fought. That is how 500,000 Jewish people ended up in the military.

http://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2014/10/forgotten-jewish-fighters/

Local Oregon-Washington News & 8th AFHS Meeting

Veteran's Day Events at Camp Withycombe, Oregon

Join us on Saturday, November 8, 2014 for a Veteran's Day Open House, 10 AM- 2 PM, and a 5K run/walk - 5K Packet Pick up 7:00 AM - 8:30 AM

Kids' Race (ages 8 and under) 8:30 AM

5K STARTS AT 9 AM!

Alisha Hamel, Historical Outreach Foundation | Alisha@historicaloutreach.com | Historical Outreach Foundation | Camp Withycombe 15300 SE Minuteman Way | Clackamas, OR 97015

http://historicaloutreach.com/vets-day-open-house.html

 

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is November 1, 2014

 A hot type meal, for $13, will be available at the Beaverton Elks lodge. ONLY If you are planning to eat contact Tom Philo via email atsecretary@8thafhsoregon.com or phone him at 503-591-3227 – again ONLY if you are planning to purchase a meal.

Prior Programs

· Dick Foy and Air Tanker Operations w/ WWII Aircraft

· Beauty and Brains – Women in the Military

· Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

· Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

· B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse”

· Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.


Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for June 2014

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

 

 

A Happy Valley P-38 Pilot

Look Mom - I Can Fly! Memoirs of a World War II Fighter Pilot

 

Robert "Smoky" Vrilakas, a local Happy Valley P-38 Pilot, who escorted B-17s, B-24's, and B-26's out of N. Africa and Italy.   Great reader comments on Amazon.com. See web page at: www.p38book.com Signed copies available through above address or web site.

Rebuilding a P40 for New Orleans Museum

El Cajon’s Flyboys Aeroworks spent the past year-and-a-half building this sleek aircraft, a sister to the fighters the Flying Tigers flew over India, Burma and China. Work was slow — “We had to build it all from scratch,” said Jenny Bishop, a Flyboys mechanic — but now this projecthttp://www.utsandiego.com/news/2014/jan/18/flyboys-soar-p40-warhawk/

is gaining speed.

Touring the Battleship USS North Carolina

Anyone can experience the nine-level battleship in a self-guided tour following arrows and climbing up ladders. An introductory video welcomes guests to the ship before allowing them to explore the exhibit hall and climbing aboard the USS North Carolina.

http://www.camplejeuneglobe.com/carolina_living/article_091b6928-7e0f-11e3-94cc-0019bb2963f4.html

Wives and Sweethearts :  a book on love letters from the two world wars using the archives of the National Army Museum in London

Mail service to and from troops is a blessing – sometimes.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/jan/22/world-war-letters-wives-sweethearts

Gene Spencer Tells True Love Story of World War II Pilot: “The Last Mission”

Based on the experience of Emma Jane Foster (Jane) and John Emil Petach (Pete) in the AVG – American Volunteer Group – aka The Flying Tigers – he tells their story and others who severed in the group from December 1941 thru their disbandment on July 4, 1942.

http://www.digitaljournal.com/pr/1706479#ixzz344mvK0HW

 

A Forgotten Front – Alaska and the Aleutians

The 11th Air Force fought on US soil and was largely ignored – due to the remoteness and the unwillingness of the press to go to a miserable location, not an exotic location like the south pacific or Europe, and fought over frozen land and sea nearly year round.

One fighter group went there with 60 pilots – and 15 came back after their tour was over.

http://www.chicagonow.com/letters-world-war-2-airman/2014/02/world-war-ii-japanese-on-american-soil/

Spanish American War and the Rough Riders

The unit that President Theodore Roosevelt helped form, and then helped lead, during the 1898 war gets a monument in Tampa, Florida. Tampa's Rough Riders Club met at Veterans  

http://tbo.com/news/breaking-news/all/veterans-rough-riders-dedicate-memorial-to-spanish-american-war-20140201/

The original Commander of the Rough Riders, William Owen O'Neill,  was killed in action – after he refused to take cover – he was the only one standing after all his men “hit the dirt” when they started taking fire from the hill above.

http://www.azcentral.com/story/travel/local/history/2014/05/20/buckey-oneill-rough-riders-founder/9329679/

 Filed Away Photos of Spanish American War Re-discovered

Photographic archivists from the Naval History and Heritage Command have rediscovered about 150 original glass plate photographs from the Spanish-American War that may not have been seen by the public for more than a century.

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/02/08/archivists-discover-forgotten-spanish-american-war-pictures/

 

End of the Line for A-10 and U-2?

The Air Force has been trying to get rid of the A-10 since before the 1991 Gulf War – now they may have finally succeeded. Course we could sell the A-10 to any 3rd world country once we take them out of our inventory – since they are so “old” why not?

http://www.flyingmag.com/aircraft/jets/end-road-u2-and-a10

Joy Riding in B-17 “My Baby” of the 91st BG (H)

WW II was so involved it always seemed that someone you knew from “home” was always around in some unit nearby. So visiting a friend was natural for all. But when you are assigned to a non-flying unit, and you go along to with a co-worker who wants to visit a friend, who happens to be a pilot of a B-17 unbeknownst to you, and wants to go flying – you do.

 http://www.redbluffdailynews.com/business/ci_25254412/men-connect-over-tale-b-17-joy-ride

 “Five Graves to Cairo”

During WW II there were lots of spy movies – and this one directed by Billy Wilder, uses North Africa as a location and of course has General Erwin Rommel in it. The movie takes place before his promotion to Field Marshall.


There are many other places that have movie nights with WW II themes.

http://chestnuthilllocal.com/blog/2014/03/03/five-graves-cairo-screening-march-4/

 

Sunken DC-3 an Underwater Playground

Deliberatly sunk by the Turkish government, for some unknown reason instead of being sold off, it now lies 70 feet below the surface in the Mediterranean near Cas, Turkey.

http://www.mercurynews.com/travel/ci_25343989/sunken-world-war-ii-plane-becomes-underwater-playground

 

Pilot gets to see his Old Training Aircraft He Flew

Not often is the exact aircraft that you actually flew in still around. Murray Adams was able to visit his A-20-10 Wirraway in Brisbane, Australia.

 Joining the Air Force

“I managed to cheat my through the medical, but then I got put in front of a panel and they asked me 10 questions about planes and I got none right. I thought that was my goose cooked, but then the fellow in charge asked me what my favourite sports were and I told him tennis and skiing.  He didn’t care for tennis but he was a mad skier and I was in.”

 

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/leader/south-east/wwii-pilot-reunited-with-his-1941-aircraft-in-moorabbin/story-fngnvmhm-1226851668687

Secret Diary of Jet Engines

Henry Storborg, while working under contract for Frank Whittle in an engineering company, kept a diary of drawings of what he was working on – the first British Jet Engine. The drawings are now being auctioned off.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2578269/The-blueprint-Jet-Age-Secret-archive-chief-engineer-worked-development-revolutionary-fighter-plane-engine.html#ixzz345HAg3i6

 Restoring a P-61 “Black Widow”

On New Guinea in January of 1945 while on a maintenance flight this P-61 crashed – it’s been over 28 years since the first recovery effort – and the plane is still in the shop.

http://www.ydr.com/local/ci_25409984/wwii-fighter-plane-recovered-from-new-guinea-has

 

Crash of a B-24 in Idaho – Rediscovered

In January of 1944 during a practice bombing run at night, B-24 42-73365 was seen on it’s 4th bomb run to pitch down and crash into the ground – all 7 on board were killed.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/may/25/ww-ii-era-plane-crash-site-rediscovered-at-inl/

 

VMF 214 Pilot remembers close call aboard the USS Franklin when it was attacked

A JUDY dive bomber, a follow-on to the VAL, followed friendly a/c and then dive bombed the carrier USS Franklin as it was about to launch planes. The two 500 pound bombs had the same effect on our carrier as our dive bombers had at Midway – rendered the Franklin inoperative.

Ralph Warren was in the ready room when that happened and he had to jump off the deck to survive.

http://www.greenvilleonline.com/story/news/local/2014/05/26/world-war-ii-vets-cheated-death-twice-honor-fallen-brothers/9584993/

 

Takes a Long Time for Some Veteran Benefits to End

There are still some benefits being paid to children of the US Civil War.

“More than 3 million men fought and 530,000 men died in the conflict between North and South. Pvt. Mose Triplett joined the rebels, deserted on the road to Gettysburg, defected to the Union and married so late in life to a woman so young that their daughter Irene is today 84 years old—and the last child of any Civil War veteran still on the VA benefits rolls.”

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303603904579493830954152394

 

BBC Does a Special to Scotland’s Greatest WW II Pilot - Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown

The BBC plays up the “Greatest” a bit. He is the most decorated test pilot of all time, has flown more types of aircraft than anyone in history (a record 487), survived 11 crashes, was the first person to land a jet on an aircraft carrier in 1945 and holds an MBE, OBE and CBE.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/scotlands-greatest-ever-pilot-captain-3633394

 

A Radio Operator Gets a Medal

When their Halifax bomber was damaged over Frankfurt in March of 1945, Adelaide man Kevin Dennis, stayed at his post, transmitting messages to get to an emergency base, where the damaged plane landed. He was awarded the 1nd highest award an aircrew could get - Conspicuous Gallantry Medal.
He was formally honored at the war memorial.

The Halifax bomber could not fly as high as the Lancaster, thus as a percentage more were lost due to flak and enemy fighters since they flew so comparatively low – around 17,000 feet.

 http://www.smh.com.au/act-news/world-war-ii-raaf-bomber-radio-operator-kevin-dennis-recognised-in-ceremony-20140601-zru9m.html

 

Canadian  Loggers Discover Aircraft Lost in 1942

While logging a hilltop they discovered aircraft parts, including flying boots and other personal gear, and the four men on board the Avro Anson aircraft have been identified.

 

http://www.newsmax.com/thewire/world-war-ii-plane-crash/2014/06/02/id/574523/

Not Often Can You Take Pictures of Two Different Lightnings at the Same Time

This occurred at an airshow at Luke Air Force Base.

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/blog/2014/03/air-show-lightning-f-35-flies-alongside-its-world.html

 

The Boxer Rebellion – in A Graphic Novel Format

For those people who never really liked to read history books <grin>.

http://www.pri.org/stories/2014-03-26/gene-luen-yang-puts-china-s-boxer-rebellion-vivid-explosive-color-his-new-graphic

Aircraft Drones Are Not New

Aircraft drones were used by the US, Germany and other nations during WW II. Some were remotely controlled target drones – used to train naval gunners against a real moving target – scaled to match full size planes. There is one at Tillamook Air Museum. Others were radio guided glide and powered bombs. The German Luftwaffe sunk a troop ship in the Mediterranean in 1943 with their version of a drone.

http://paleofuture.gizmodo.com/the-tv-guided-drones-of-world-war-ii-1560130671

 

A “Desert Rat” of Tobruk

Fighting in 1941 and 1942 in North Afrika, enduring the 8 ½ month siege of Tobruk,  Sydney Kinsman was taken prisoner in 1942.

http://www.ntnews.com.au/news/centralian-advocate/veteran-says-thanks-to-those-who-remember-the-lost-at-war/story-fnk4wgm8-1226895796280O

Spanish American War Memorial

In Florida there used to be real correct era artillery memorial – but it was scrapped and melted down in WW II and a post WW II version was put in its place which is now the University of Tampa campus.

http://tbo.com/Local/CommunityNews/then-now-spanish-american-war-memorial-1963-and-now-20140504/

 

An Aircraft App of WW II Aircraft on Mobile Devices

Jourist Verlags GmbH  has published an app of “Images and information about 300 planes that fought and serviced the Second World War are now accessible in full detail. This app offers a table of extensive statistics on each aircraft including dimensions, development history, performance and career. Both Allied and Axis nations' airplanes can be viewed in full color illustrations and a search option enables simple navigation.”

http://www.itbusinessnet.com/article/Jourist-Verlags-GmbH-Announces-Aircraft-of-World-War-II-Application-Now-Available-for-Intel-Atom-Tablets-for-Windows*-81-3257887

Local Chapter Area Oregon News

Collings bombers etc. will stop in Corvallis on June 11, 12, 13

They are taking their planes on their annual tour around the country. Go to www.collingsfoundation.org  for details. The planes on tour are the  B-17, B-24 & P-51.

Warbirds Over The West – Aurora Airport June 13-15th

Dinner with Warbird pilots on Friday, tours on Saturday, Awards Dinner on Saturday and much more.

See www.B17Alliancegroup.org for details.

 

Tillamook Air Museum has started moving all their aircraft to Madras

The collect was sold off in 2013.

http://www.dailyastorian.com/news/northwest/museum-begins-to-move-historic-airplane-collection-to-central-oregon/article_c9c32c16-526d-578f-a9c3-a33d81bf568c.html

Animation Film “The Wind Rises”

The basic premise of The Wind Rises tells the fictionalized biography of Jiro Horikoshi, the chief engineer behind many Japanese WWI fighter planes, on his journey to build a plane that could match the West's more advanced technology.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/hayao-miyazakis-wind-rises-wwii-fighter-planes-that-inspired-animation-master-1449194

 

The 7th Annual Patriotic Tribute at Volcanoes Stadium this July 4, 5 and 6 2014

Friday July 4th designated as Vietnam Veterans Appreciation Night.  

 It will be a very exciting evening, capped off with an outstanding Fireworks show.   Our very formal “Fallen Soldier” Ceremony at home plate will be for Lance Corporal William Koho, of Bend, who was killed on 14 March 1967, as he will be representing all 719 Oregon Warriors who “Walked into the Arms of GOD” defending our freedoms in Vietnam.   He was only 19.

 

There are only two Vietnam Prisoners of War in Oregon, and one living Medal of Honor recipient in Oregon, and we have confirmed all three for this evening, 

Friday, July  4th, which is very, very exciting.

    

Air Force Lt. Colonel (Ret) Bob Jeffrey – in 1965 as a Captain F-4 pilot, he had been in Vietnam only three days, and on his first combat mission when he was

shot down, and taken prisoner for 7 years and 3 months.

 

Marine Corps Captain Ernie Brace – the longest held American civilian in a Vietnam prison.   Former Marine fighter pilot serving from 1947-1961, and was shot down, his plane crashed into the Sea of Japan, and he was rescued by our USS Kidd.   He then began lying in Vietnam and Laos for the CIA when he was captured.   He spent 7 years and 10 months as a prisoner, five of which were in solitary confinement, and in the cell next to him was now Senator John McCain.  

 

Army Corporal Robert Maxwell, the oldest living Medal of Honor recipient in the United States at 93.   He served in WWII, but what an Honor to have him also even though he was not a Vietnam Veteran.

 

Army Major Larry Deibert, Oregon’s Most Decorated National Guardsman who flew 578 combat flights in Vietnam.

 

The Roswell Flight Center is bringing their drone which will perform many functions such as get the game ball from the umpire and deliver it to the pitcher to start the game, and film our post-game Fireworks from high above looking down; should be spectacular.

 

Our entire stadium will be ringed with 176 giant American Flags.    Another 100 service flags will be posted throughout the stadium.   30 Military organizations who reach out to Military families with assistance will have a table and information on the concourse.   

 

E-MAIL:            j.howard@volcanoesbaseball.com   TELEPHONE:   503-428-5246

 

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is August 9, 2014

 

A sandwich type meal, for $10, will be available at the Beaverton Elks lodge. ONLY If you are planning to eat contact Tom Philo via email atsecretary@8thafhsoregon.com or phone him at 503-591-3227 – again ONLY if you are planning to purchase a meal.

Prior 2014 Programs

·         Beauty and Brains – Women in the Military

·        Converting Military a/c to Firefighting Program: Richard “Dick” Foy – Co founder of Aero Union Corporation.

Previous PROGRAMs in 2013:

·        Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

·        ;Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

·        B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse”

·        Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

 

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 


398th BOMB GROUP MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION
8th AIR FORCE • 1st AIR DIVISION • NUTHAMPSTEAD, ENGLAND
'FLAK NEWS
July 2013


Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for February 2014

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

New Zenith Press Book from Robert F. Dorr in October

Fighting Hitler's Jets [Editor’s Note: My copy arrived in November and will be reading it over th next month or so. Review to follow. Walter Groce, who died last year and was a member of our Oregon 8th AFHS, was the first pilot to get a good video of a 262 – he shot it down in an inverted head-on pass.  

 [Correction] He was climbing up when he made the shot – then went inverted to watch the jet move away and then then he spiraled down and shot more at the jet to get better film footage after the pilot had bailed out![ I had him inverted when firing initially, he stated he ended up inverted.]

Fighting Hitler's Jets: The Extraordinary Story of the American Airmen Who Beat the Luftwaffe and Defeated Nazi Germany  [Amazon Link]

[My Review]

FHJ covers WW II aerial combat which occurred mainly between the American fighter pilots who encountered the Me-163, Me-262 and Ar-234 jets in 1944 and 1945. Told from the view of the combat pilot’s encounters via combat reports, and interviews with surviving pilots of both sides, it reveals both the technical and operational issues that confronted those trying to shoot down the jets and those flying the jets.

 

It covers the rare aircraft that the Third Reich researched, tested, and in some cases the prototypes which were built but never put into full production of both prop and jet aircraft. It also covers the jet aircraft the both the British and Americans were developing concurrently with the Germans and how captured aircraft and data influenced the design of postwar jets of all countries.

 

The book delves into the detailed records of the encounters against the jets by describing the aerial combat by combining both views of the engagement into one flowing narrative.  From my perspective this works well since three people that I personally know encountered the jets: two fighter pilots: Capt. Walter Gross & Capt Clayton Kelly Gross,  as well as a B-17 pilot Larry J Bellarts whose tail gunner shot down a Me-262 late in the war.  I have the gun camera film of Lt Walter’s Gross’s encounter. So the narrative is accurate when compared against the three with whom I have talked with about their jet combat encounters.

 

Some of the operational issues, tactics employed, and technical issues discussed in the book were new to me. This means that those who are new to the whole prop versus jet combat as well as those who already know something about it will learn something new after reading the book.


A complete list of all jet aircraft lost in combat is included along with their wrk number.

 

Robert F. Dorr, the author of "Mission to Berlin," a history of Eighth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortress crews, wanted "Milk Run" readers to know that they can get signed, first-edition copies of his book — which one reviewer called "'Band of Brothers' with Planes" — at a 45% discount plus postage. The book has a retail price of $28 not counting packaging and shipping; get it from Bob for $19, including packaging and shipping. Bob makes his books available on a not-for-profit basis and donates proceeds to charity. If you want one or more signed copies of this character-driven narrative history, contact Bob at (703) 264-8950 or robert.f.dorr@cox.net. Bob told us that he wishes people would pick up the phone more often, so don't hesitate to call him. 

 

Commentary on the Outbreak of Media Events about WW I

This year is the 100th anniversary of the start of “The Great War” aka: WW I.

Simon Jenkins from The Guardian:

“I must apologise to the Germans. They are about to suffer an avalanche of often sickening Great War memorabilia, largely at their expense. It will be the British at their worst: sanctimonious, self-congratulatory, worshipping at the tomb of the unknown, awful German. The centenary of the first world war is already flooding the television schedules before the date of its outbreak (in autumn 1914).”

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jan/30/first-world-war-worship-sickening-avalanche

 

Purple Heart Re-United with Descendants of Awardee

Wounded on July 1 in 1918 while in the 2nd Infantry Division in France, Pvt. 1st Class Frank E. Conroy was was awarded the Purple Heart. Medals were routinely customized by the US Government with the names of who it belonged to during WW I (unlike WW II). After 96 years Purple Hearts Reunited discovered it and traced down the descendants and gave it back to them.

 

https://bangordailynews.com/2014/02/02/living/long-lost-purple-heart-medal-finds-its-way-back-home-to-maine/

 

How Many Soldiers Really Died During WWI?

 

When counting the human cost of WW I there are many variables: Number of soldiers actually tracked, civilians before and after the war, migration of people, direct and indirect effects that caused the death of them. Most estimates state that 9 million SOLIDERS died during the war. But how those statistics were gathers, who counted them, and official omissions has led French historian Antoine Prost to say that actually 10 million soldiers died during the war.

 

Some countries were well organized in tending to the graves of those killed in action during  WW I, some were haphazard, some did nothing.

 

http://www.france24.com/en/20140122-world-war-one-death-count-too-low-one-million-antoine-prost/#./?&_suid=1391472483052014222403953640217

 

Keeping paper Records – Proved He was Entitled to His Awards

After getting out of the 8th AF at the end of WW II George Hatcher took his DD-214, a single sheet of paper showing time served and award earned while in the military, and he it filed in the country courthouse.

When he finally asked to be given the metals, some 70 years later, the Army said he was not entitled to some – but his DD 214 said he was. So having a paper record allowed him to get the awards - with some help from his congressional delegation.

 

http://www.johnsoncitypress.com/article/114144/erwin-nine-member-receives-awards-after-70-years

 

Victory at Stalingrad – 71st Anniversary

 

February is the month in which the Battle of Stalingrad ended. It started in August of 1942 (start dates vary depending on what source you read) and ended on February 2, 1943 when the last group of Germans surrounded in the Red October Factory area surrendered.

http://www.tvr.by/eng/news.asp?id=16519&cid=16

Russian Veterans Dying off Fast Too

The Soviet Union, and the successor states after it broke up, always kept exact track of everyone so the ability to know exactly who is where and what role they played during WW II is precise.

 

In Belarus, where a lot of fighting took place in the early part and the later part of the war (including the destruction of Army Group Center in 1944) there are exactly 22,086 veterans of the Great Patriotic War as of January 1, 2014, still living within the country.

 

http://news.belta.by/en/news/society?id=739098

Marshal Vasily Ivanovich Petrov dead at 98

Starting the war as a Lieutenant, he fought throughout the war (a rare feat for such a junior officer on the front lines) and became a Marshall in the 1980s.

 

http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_02_02/Soviet-era-Marshal-Vasily-Petrov-dies-at-98-0532/

 

German TV / Movie Generation War

 

Now released worldwide after a German only showing in 2013, it depicts five friends who go off to war on the Eastern front in 1941 and of whom only three returned.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/02/05/opinion/the-unquiet-ghosts-of-nazi-germany.html?_r=0

'The Monuments Men'

As part of Allied planning and operation works of art, both small and large, were always thought about during combat operations. The 8th and 15th Air Forces always planned bombing missions to avoid very historical sections of Allied nations (and sometimes non-allies). This new movie depicts the on the ground effort put forth to ensure that works of art were not destroyed whenever possible.

Some towns, like La Rochelle on the Bay of Biscay on the French coast, were never bombed even though a U-Boat base was there – due to the very historical town itself. After invasion of France the allies just surrounded it and it only surrendered at the end of the war.

 

http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/stories/historian-sheds-light-on-the-monuments-men

Soviet Era War Posters

The University of Nottingham has a very large collection of USSR war posters – all scanned in high resolution for web viewing also.

http://boingboing.net/2014/02/02/massive-collection-of-soviet-w.html

 

 

ANZIO – The “End Run” that Wasn’t

The resort town of Anzio was the site of an amphibious assault designed to bypass the German defense line holding up the Allies and collapse the whole German defense of central Italy – but due to lots of factors it turned into a 4 month long battle where the lines hardly moved at all. A series of Life Magazine photos.

http://life.time.com/history/anzio-unpublished-photos-italian-campaign-world-war-ii/#1

 

Making history: The Great War Educational War Game

Coming out on July 28, 2014, on the 100th Anniversary of the Start of WW I, this is a multiplayer game that puts players in the role of each nation.

 

http://venturebeat.com/2014/02/04/muzzy-lane-launches-educational-strategy-game-on-world-war-i/

 

Fascism & the Pope Pius XI

A new book explores the relationship that the Catholic pope had with Fascism before & during WW II.

http://www.npr.org/2014/01/27/265794658/pope-and-mussolini-tells-the-secret-history-of-fascism-and-the-church

 

Auctioning Once Looted Art

Finding out who really owns European pre-WW II art is very difficult, but auction houses, who profit enormously when selling these artworks, have become specialists in researching the providence of all sorts of artworks in order to sell them now.

 

http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303973704579355161451467386

 

On Feb 3, 1945 Lt “Rosie” Rosenthal lead a 1000 plane raid to Berlin

 

LT. Rosenthal was lucky to lead this raid. On a prior mission he was the only plane to come back to Thorpe Abbots out of the 15 sent out with the 100th BG (Heavy).

 

PTSD Treatment in the 1940s – Lobotomy

After piloting 34 combat missions in a B-17s over Europe in the 728th Squadron of the 452nd Bombardment Group (H), Roman Tritz had what is now called PTSD – but back then there were no drugs or detailed psychological programs to treat the post combat stress the mind was working on. So the VA did Lobotomies on Veterans – over 2,000 of them in the 1940s and early 1950s.

 

http://www.kvoa.com/news/wis-wwii-vet-was-lobotomized-by-govt-after-war/

 

Telling of Father’s Multiple Escapes Gets Her United with Father’s Wingman

Katky Knick’s father, Lt Karl Kurbjun,  flew in the 486th BG (H) out of Sudbury England, and was shot down over Liepzig in 1944. In a photo that shows her father’s plane another plane, that of Lt Alfred Sanders, who was able to return to base with his plane damaged. He called her up after hearing her relate her father’s story.

 

http://chronicle.augusta.com/news/metro/2014-02-02/chronicle-wwii-escape-story-unites-military-families?v=1391389672

 

A Sightseeing Ride Turned Deadly

On May 10, 1945, a group formation to fly at low level over Germany to see the damage caused by the 8th Air Force turned deadly when two B-17s collided over Bocking in northern Essex – one of which was just forming up to do the tour then head back to the US.

 

http://www.lakewyliepilot.com/2014/02/03/2279521/town-in-england-memorializing.html

 

 

Flying Intelligence and Bombing Missions 5 Miles Up

Howard Jackson flew combat missions – but some were designed to gather intelligence and not just drop bombs on factory and military targets.

“Understand that we would fly over a country that we never were in, over a city which we couldn’t pronounce the name, and we had an 8-by-10 photograph of an intersection to bomb a bridge or something, and you’re 5 miles up in the air, 30 degrees below zero, under oxygen, everyone yelling at you, you’re being shot at, and you’ve got to find this individual target. We never, ever bombed indiscriminately.”

 

http://shelterislandreporter.timesreview.com/2014/01/17/island-profile-howard-jackson%E2%80%82and-a-war-he-cant-forget/

 

Trained For Desert Warfare in WW II – Sent to Attu & The South Pacific

Clifford A. Hahn quit his job at a Bethlehem Steel Plant (he would have been exempt from the draft) and joined the Army in WW II. Ending up with the 7th Infantry Division at Ft Irwin in California and training with the division for desert warfare the 7th was assigned to take back the Aleutians and then onto the South Pacific – where the only sand seen would be on the beaches.

 

http://www.mcall.com/news/local/mc-war-story-clifford-hahn-20140125,0,4254154.story

 

Oregon Chapter News

Local Area News

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is February 22, 2014

Previous PROGRAMs in 2013:

·        Ben “Flaps” Berry – Tuskegee Airman

·        ;Jack Kline and the Vanport Flood

·        B-29 Navigator of “Going Jesse”

·        Bob Schuberg and revisiting the airfields of the 8th

All programs are videotaped and transcribed and put into our archive. You can purchase each DVD of each presentation for $10.00.

 

There is no cost to attend the meeting and it is open to the public.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 

 


Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for July 2013

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

July 4, 1942 – 8th Air Force makes it Presence Known to the Germans

Flying borrowed A-20 “Boston” bombers which had been sent to the British via Lend-Lease, US bomber crews fly a low level mission against German air bases in the Netherlands - losing 3 out of 6 aircraft dispatched. The circle with a 2 by it is the second of the three A-20s in the flight over the German airbase. Both Boston number 2 and 3 were shot down over the base.

 

The British also sent 6 a/c in the coordinated mission. 1 US flown Boston was shot down on the way back by an FW-190.

 

This image is from the US Army Air Forces magazine “Impact”. It was a monthly publication that showed tactics, bombing results, combat damage, enemy aircraft info, and was distributed worldwide for all aircraft personnel in combat. It was marked “Confidential” and did not start being published till April of 1943.

 

 

US Navy History Site

Naval History and Heritage Command web site:

http://www.history.navy.mil/index.html

Guns vs. Butter – Economics and Food Production

 

“I noticed something funny. As Europe went to war in 1939 and the United States started arming itself butter consumption actually went up not down. That turns it into a nice example of a totally different economic phenomenon—"crowding in" due to effective fiscal and monetary stimulus. The Great Depression and the recession-within-a-Depression of 1937 had left the country with enough excess capacity for both guns and butter.”

 

http://www.slate.com/blogs/moneybox/2013/07/03/butter_rationing_guns_vs_butter_in_world_war_ii.html

 

US Centennial Coins for WW I?

A bill in the US House of Representatives H.R. 2366 was introduced on June 13 to have the US Treasury to mint commemorative coins about World War I.

 

http://news.coinupdate.com/world-war-i-centennial-commemorative-coins-sought-2035/

 

A Riverside Solider in WW I

After “going over the top” in October Lt. Charles Leon Deaver was listed as missing in action – but actually was captured and then later died of wounds.

 

http://www.pe.com/local-news/columns/back-in-the-day-headlines/20130625-back-in-the-day-riverside-lieutenant-went-missing-in-world-war-i.ece

 

How Many Missions did an aircrew had to fly in WW II

This really depended on where you were sent, the type of a/c that you flew, and when in the war you were initially assigned.

 

Lee Cunningham found a nice 1968 US Air Force Historical Branch study which I summarized below:

 

1942: 100 to 125 combat hours or 1 year

Then sent to a rest area for at least a week, and then returned to combat. If replacement crews were available then the person would be rotated to the States for 30 days of leave, then back into combat. (The rest area rule applied everywhere.)

 

8 Nov 1942 12th AF (Doolittle): 25-30 sorties, 150-200 hours

 

Dec 1942 8th AF (Eaker): 30 Sorties or 200, with options of 25 combat missions and 150 hours

 

Dec 1942 13th AF: A Mathematical formula.

Formula took into account the number of months (A ), hours of flying time (T ), and number of missions (M) the man had in the South Pacific Theater of Operations. The formula for bomber pilots was: T/100 + M/10 + 1/3 = Score. That for fighter pilots was: T/100 + M/30 + A/3 = Score. Above 6 you went to the states.

Dec 1943 12th AF: 50 Missions and 150 hours light and medium bombers, recon a/c and fighters; 50 missions and 250 hours for heavy bomber crews.

 

Dec 1943 9th AF: 50 missions for all medium bomber crews and 200 hours for all fighters.

 

Feb 1944 8th AF: 30 missions for all bomber crews; 200 hours for fighters

 

June 1944 20th AF: 35 missions (B-29s)

 

July 1944 8th AF: 35 missions for all bomber crews

 

July 1944 7th AF: 30 Missions

 

September 1944 12th & 15th AF: 50 sorties heavy-bomber, photo-reconnaissance, and weather aircraft; 70 sorties long- range fighters; 100 sorties short-range fighters. The same kind of system was established in Ninth Air Force where the guide for bomber crewmen, for example, was 65 sorties.

 

Oct 1944 7th AF: 40 heavy bombers; 60 Medium bombers; 8 months for fighter and photo recon pilots.

Riding in a 40 and 8

 

Moving troops around in France usually meant boarding a train and being placed into a boxcar. The boxcars were designed to hold 40 troops or eight horses – hence the name 40 and 8. After the war France gave 48 of these cars to the US – one to be given to each state. Some states have lost track of theirs. I think there are only 38 left in the US now. Oregon has theirs.

 

http://www.al.com/living/index.ssf/2013/07/athens_world_war_ii_veteran_re.html

 

June 22, 1941

The largest invasion in history started on June 22, 1941 at around 3 AM when Germany and its allies invaded the USSR – but it was still  June 21, 1941 when the USA learned of it. Sometimes you see the date of the NAZI / USSR conflict starting on June 21 because of the time zone differences and the news reports.

 

At one point over 80% of all German resources was arranged against the Soviet Forces. At the end of the war 65% were facing the East and 35% were arranged against the Western Allies.

 

Over 20 million Soviets died as a result of the four years of warfare.

 

They are still making both board and computer games about the combat on The Eastern Front.

 

WW II in KodaChrome

The Daily mail has on their web site some images of WW II that were created using the now non-existent KodaChrome slide method of photography.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2352173/World-War-II-Kodachrome-Vivid-color-photos-paint-moving-picture-1940s-American-war-effort.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

 

Re-Enactors Needed in Hearne Texas in October

If you happen to be a WW II re-enactor and live wherever Hearne is at, they need you for their living history event.

http://www.tdtnews.com/news/article_461dabc0-e133-11e2-b49d-0019bb30f31a.html

 

Dornier 17 Lifted from the Channel

The ONLY Do-17z Werke number 1160 in the world is now headed toward a restoration. It was shot down during the Battle of Britain in 1940.

http://www.eveningexpress.co.uk/Article.aspx/3273681

 

A Watch to Decode

Some very exclusive watches are being made by Bremont – inspired by the code breakers of Bletchley Park.

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/elizabethdoerr/2013/06/29/bremont-codebreaker-a-watch-made-with-world-war-ii-enigma-parts/

 

AAA at Iwo Jima

The Japanese Air Force and Navy were not engaged in ground support by 1945, but there were still Army and Marine AAA units attached to US divisions, but they ended up providing direct support to the infantry.

http://www.marshalltribune.com/story/1981021.html

Arctic Convoy Medals

After a nearly two decades long battle, UK sailors finally got a combat medal for ferrying supplies to the USSR during WW II. The medals are finally being distributed.

 

http://www.thenorthernecho.co.uk/news/10518982.Arctic_Convoys_veteran_honoured_with_medal_after_69_years/

 

'Here's 100 gold sovereigns, get to Ostend before it falls into enemy hands'

Basil Clarke started his WW I war reporting with that directive – even though  the French and British had already started to restrict when and where reporters were allowed to go and what they could write about  in World War I.

 

“He was finally forced to return home in January 1915, by which time he was one of just two reporters left in the war zone.”

 

Winston Churchill got his start by reporting about the Boer War.

 

http://www.pressgazette.co.uk/content/heres-100-gold-sovereigns-get-ostend-it-falls-enemy-hands-book-tells-story-journalist-and-pr

 

LST 821 Fighting the Chinese – While stuck on a Reef

Not a WW II fight, but a modern “who owns these islands” type of a fight. The Philippines ran this 1944 built LST onto the reef so that the marines on board had someplace to be while watching the Chinese.

“The average landing operation would render ten percent of the LSTs involved unfit for further service.”

This one is one of those that had a 100% chance of being unfit.

 

http://www.strategypage.com/dls/articles/World-War-II-LST-Threatens-China-6-28-2013.asp

 

“The Guns at Last Light” Published

The third book of the trilogy about the US in WW II by Rick Atkinson is now out.

 

“The Deserters” by Charles Glass

Writing about a little publicized aspect of British and American soldiers is Charles Glass – about the 150,000 or so soldiers who deserted their assignments during the war. Only 1 US soldier was executed for deserting during WW II – Private Slovak.

 

http://www.bostonglobe.com/arts/books/2013/06/29/book-review-the-deserters-hidden-history-world-war-charles-glass/OfJp7APDlvrarf3yZwfJ0O/story.html

 

Digging into History

Underneath Lincoln Castle UK researchers found remains of a church as well as skeletons and a well preserved coffin while excavating for a new visitor center.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/02/ancient-saxon-skeletons-discovered-england-king_n_3536747.html

 

Shot Down on the 4th of July

In 1943 an American B-17, SN 42-29967 of the 92 BG, 407 BS, was shot down just off the coast of France at Noirmoutier Island. This year a lot of French, a few Americans, gathered at the spot to honor the who crew who were captured when they ditched the plane.

 

http://breakingdefense.com/2013/07/03/french-gather-by-thousands-to-honor-us-pilots-downed-on-fourth-of-july-1943/

 

A-20 Crew killed two weeks before VE Day Discovered in 2011 Buried This Year

Poets seem to run in RAF ranks. Pilot flt sgt David Raikes, radio operator flight sgt Alexander Bostock and navigator flt sgt David Perkins were all members of the RAF Volunteers and attached to 18 Squadron based at Odiham in Hampshire.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2351977/Final-salute-RAF-War-poet-Military-burial-pilot-remains-lay-forgotten-60-years-shot-down.html#ixzz2Y2dpxOxo

US Ace Brant Turley’s a/c Found in Germany

 

He was killed on the March 6, 1944 raid to Berlin when he engaged several FW-190s who were trying to attack the bombers he was escorting.

 

http://www.ksl.com/?sid=25795589&nid=1010

 

Battle of Craney Island – War of 1812

There was an Naval arms race during the Napoleonic era where the size of the guns were not based on diameter – but the weight of the shell the fired. Also the number of guns on a ship determined where in the battle line it went.

http://www.dailypress.com/features/history/our-story/dp-battle-of-craney-island-20130619,0,2913468.post

 

War of 1812 Documents bought from Private Owners

The documents were once owned by the Governor General of Canada during the War of 1812 and were purchased from his descendants.

http://www.montrealgazette.com/life/Feds+spend+nearly+700K+acquire+trove+documents+from+1812/8549867/story.html

WW II B-17 Nose Artist Donald Bevan Dead at 93

Assigned to B-17s as a gunner, his artistic abilities got them drafted into painting nose art onto the B-17s of his group.

 

He was shot down on April 17, 1943 and ended up in a POW camp. That experience allowed him to co-write the play “Stalag 17” which was turned into a movie starring William Holden in 1953.

 

http://www.news-journal.com/news/nation/artist-writer-donald-bevan-dies/article_1bcb36d1-35b3-5ada-945a-e96c846d0b0a.html

 

Buying Willow Run

The Yankee Air Museum is trying to buy 175,000 square feet of this WW II era factory that Ford built to make their version of the Consolidated B-24 Liberator heavy bomber.

 

They have until August 1 to raise $5 million.

 

http://www.hometownlife.com/article/20130702/NEWS06/307020018/Saving-history-by-foot

 

From the Spanish American War to the Present – Military Sacrifice by Japanese Ancestry Honored in Little Tokyo

Americans of Japanese descent have fought in US wars since 1898. They fought in WW II once the laws barring them were rescinded. This location honors all of them in a single place.

http://www.rafu.com/2013/06/another-name-on-the-wall/

 

Reno Airport Insurance Rules Grounds People From Flying in Collings Foundation a/c

 

The Collings Foundation carries insurance on the aircraft and people, but the Stead airport itself has mandated that the a/c carry even MORE insurance due to the number of people that a B-17 or B-24 can carry on a flight – so Collings could not sell flights on their aircraft.

 

This likely means that Collings will never go again to Reno– nor any other WW II bomber type a/c - that offers flights on airplanes. Too cost prohibitive.

 

http://www.rgj.com/article/20130604/NEWS/130604028/Insurance-issue-grounds-World-War-II-planes-Reno-Stead-Airport?nclick_check=1

 

Repairing Radios for the Tuskegee Airmen

When the Government created segregated units during WW II  it also meant there had to be trained segregated support personnel. Thus Marion Wickliffe was trained to repair all types of radio and teletype gear so that when the segregated fighter unit, commonly known as The Tuskegee Airmen, was sent overseas to the MTO they had the support personnel to maintain all the aircraft and other equipment necessary to fight the AXIS powers.

 

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20130628/ARTICLE/130629637?p=1&tc=pg

 

The Boxer Rebellion and US Marines

If you happen to be around Brookfield, wherever that is since the web site does not mention what state it is in at all, on July 8 you can go to a multimedia presentation about the Boxer Rebellion of 1900. (I am guessing it is in Connecticut based on an ad I saw on the page.)

http://brookfield.patch.com/groups/around-town/p/american-military-forum-marines-in-chinas-boxer-rebellion

 

Navigator Russell Verby – 50 Missions

 

He flew in B-17s out of Manduria, Italy, in World War II where he completed 50 combat missions in the 450th BG(H).

 

He died at the age of 90 in Tulsa.

 

In the 15th AF on some missions crews were credited with TWO missions for flying one – when they were deep raids to Germany, Austria, and Romania. So you could actually fly 44 combat missions and meet the 50 mission rotation requirement and be sent back to the Zone of the Interior i.e.: Stateside.

 

http://www.tulsaworld.com/article.aspx/Services_held_for_WWII_veteran_Russell_Verby_90/20130620_11_A12_CUTLIN537078

 

Supporting the “Flying Tigers” in a Cargo Plane

The original “Flying Tigers” ceased to exist on July 4, 1942, when their unit was absorbed into the regular US Army Air Force – and all but a handful of the pilots and ground crew that would be immediately imposed on them if they stayed so they left. This new Air Force, however, had to be supplied and crews of C47s, C-46s carried supplies to the new units that were created to support the Chinese in their fight against the Japanese in CBI area of operations.

Tony Danna was one of those crewmen.

http://www.ydr.com/mike/ci_23434864/mike-argento-tony-danna-west-york-recalls-flying

 

Living in Landlocked Idaho? – Of course Minesweeper duty in WW II

These wooden, and sometimes steel hulled, ships had to go ahead of all the other ships to clear the waters of underwater mines before any invasion could take place. And there were the “routine” sweeping of shipping lanes to ensure that there were no enemy mines planted that would sink supply or combat ships. These two crew members served on the wood hulled USS Medrick and the USS Chickadee.

 

http://www.boisestatepublicradio.org/post/idaho-storycorps-world-war-ii-minesweepers-recall-life-sea

 

Harry “Breaker” Morant Wins Appeal

He was executed 110 years ago for following orders to kill prisoners, but a Victorian Court will hold a “non-binding” appeal of his death sentence.

http://au.news.yahoo.com/latest/a/-/latest/17749884/breaker-morant-to-have-day-in-vic-court/

 

Saw the mushroom could over Nagasaki

WORLD WAR II pilot Bernie Wimmer of Kearney, Nebraska,  was a first lieutenant and co-pilot of a B-24 bomber in the 11th Bomb Group’s 42nd Squadron in the U.S. Army Air Forces in the South Pacific during WWII from February 1943 to February 1946. He flew missions from Guam and Okinawa and bombed various islands and Japan. Wimmer was on another mission when he witnessed the mushroom cloud of the atomic bomb over Nagasaki, Japan, in 1945.

Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned The Tide in the Second World WarOregon Chapter News

Local Area News

Pearson Air Museum – Open Cockpit Day

On August 31 they will have an “Open Cockpit” event. It is at 101 NE Reserve St. Vancouver, WA. [Editor:  Don’t go to the “old museum” it no longer exists as far as I know.]

Next General Membership Meeting for Oregon 8th AFHS is August  10, 2013.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 



Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for April 2013

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

Where you in the Army Air Corps or the U S Army Air Force – YES!

The US Army owned the land based aviation aircraft till the United States Air Force was created in 1947. Before that it started off as the Army Air Service and was renamed to the US Army Air Corps in 1927.

 

In March of 1941, it was again officially renamed to the US ARMY Air Force – of which the Air Corps was an administrative assignment within the US Army Air Corps.

 

A modern equivalent of it is like wearing the Signal Corp emblem on your collar while in the US Army and being assigned to a helicopter unit.

 

“The Air Corps ceased to have an administrative structure after 9 March 1942, but as "the permanent statutory organization of the air arm, and the principal component of the Army Air Forces," the overwhelming majority of personnel assigned to the AAF were members of the Air Corps.”

 

The Army reorganization of 1941 created the new Army Air Forces. GHQ Air Force was renamed Air Force Combat Command and was assigned to the AAF. The AAF controlled both the Air Corps and Air Force Combat Command.

 

In March 1942, War Department Circular 59 divided the Army into three autonomous Zone of the Interior commands: Army Air Forces, Army Ground Forces, and Services of Supply (later, Army Service Forces). General Arnold’s title changed to Commanding General, AAF.

 

The offices of the Chief of the Air Corps and Chief of Air Force Combat Command were abolished and their functions were taken over by the AAF. The Air Corps dropped off the organization chart.

 

However, the Air Corps continued to exist, not as a subordinate element of the AAF, but as one of the combat branches of the Army to which both officers and enlisted members could be appointed, assigned, or detailed.

 

Large combat organizations in the field might have personnel from several different corps. Almost everybody in the AAF was in the Air Corps, although some AAF support personnel were from some other corps. In May 1945, 88 percent of the AAF officers and 82 percent of the enlisted members were in the Air Corps.

 

 

http://www.airforce-magazine.com/MagazineArchive/Pages/2009/July%202009/0709AirCorps.aspx

8th AF Museum Renames itself

Mighty 8th Air Force Museum is now the National Museum of the Mighty Eighth Air Force. The museum is located in Pooler, Georgia, which is just west of Savannah off of I-16.  It is going to expand to include what the 8th AF, which is still active, has also accomplished since WW II when it was initially activated.

 

http://savannahnow.com/news/2013-03-20/mighty-eighth-museum-changes-name-reflect-national-mission

BBC Orders a new WW I Drama Series “The Great War”

 

The 100th anniversary of the start of “The Great War”, now commonly referred to as World War I, comes in August of 1914. The British Broadcasting Company has ordered a 30 part series about the war. It will try and tell in five 30 minute episodes the four year long war.

 

http://www.tvwise.co.uk/2013/04/bbc-one-orders-world-war-i-drama-series-the-great-war/

 

Found by a Metal Detector

A French farmer, who was told never to plow a field because of buried soldiers in still there from WW I, instead used a metal detector to find items and discovered five British Soldiers in the field.

 

http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/2013/04/09/merseyside-family-set-to-bury-their-world-war-i-hero-ancestor-96-years-after-his-death-100252-33139922/

A new book out on the Romanian Front of WW I

World War I, like WW II, was spread throughout Europe. And just like WW II reporting, information from the Eastern front, Balkans, Greece, Middle East  was often lacking due to governments preventing news reporters from going to where the action was. A new book about the Romanian front was published by University press of Kansas.

 

 

The Romanian Battlefront in World War I , by Glenn E. Torrey

 

Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2012. Pp. xvi, 426. Illus., maps, tables, notes, biblio, index. $39.95. ISBN: 0700618392.

 

http://www.strategypage.com/bookreviews/845.asp

 

Restored A-26 “Invader” Gets an Award

The Lady Liberty group was awarded the 2012 Commemorative Air Force Distinguished Unit Citation at the Commemorative Air Force Winter Conference in Midland, Texas.

The aircraft owned by Enid CAF is the oldest flying Invader, Ediger said. It was the 130th one produced, and was accepted Aug. 18, 1944, at Long Beach, Calif. It was flown to Great Dunnow, England on Sept. 20, 1944, where it was assigned to the 9th Air Force.

 

The USAF Historical Squadron at Maxwell Air Force Base does not have specific unit history of the aircraft.

 

http://enidnews.com/localnews/x1499304932/A-26-restoration-group-wins-award

 

WW I Bereavement Scroll

World War I saw the British Government go to much more depth and effort to honor those killed and those who survived the War. Medals awarded were engraved along the edges with the name of the recipient, certificates were issued for all sorts of items. A Bereavement scroll, found in an office move, was returned to the heirs of a solider killed on October of 1918.

 

http://www.acadvertiser.co.uk/lanarkshire-news/local-news/monklands-news/2013/04/10/world-war-i-soldier-s-death-certificate-returned-to-family-65864-33145242/

 

Middle Wallop Museum display on WW I Flying

Until September 27, 2013, if you are at the Middle Wallop museum, you can see a display about No 6 RFC squadron.

 

Middle Wallop was also a key base during the Battle of Britain in WW II.

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-hampshire-21899016

 

O-47 Found after a wild fire

Over 12,000 military aircraft accidents occurred within the US during WW II. One of those was an O-47 reconnaissance plane based out of Burns, Oregon.

 

During a fire at the Shasta-Trinity National Forest in 2012 a fire-fighter, an x Air Force person, found the aircraft wreckage at 2 AM in the night while fighting the fire.

 

http://www.commercialappeal.com/news/2013/mar/24/world-war-ii-crash-site-found-during-wildfire-tell/

 

New Aviation Museum opens at Selfridge

Housed at the Air National Guard base it has a variety of aircraft arranged to view them from the oldest aircraft to the newest.

 

[Editor’s note:  The base is located somewhere in Michigan since the newspaper banner has NO information as to even what state the newspaper is even in!!]

 

http://www.voicenews.com/articles/2013/04/12/life/doc516834aef1c19919383671.txt

 

Armenian Legion Exhibit in Boston

 

A separate Armenian unit was formed by recruiting people from around the world of direct Armenian decent (unlike the International Brigade of the Spanish Civil war of 1930s which comprised of numerous nationalities) during WW I and was deployed to the Middle East (Lawrence of Arabia area) under the command of General Edmund Allenby.

 

It ends on May 1, 2013.

 

http://www.panarmenian.net/eng/news/150864/Boston_to_host_Armenian_Legion_in_World_War_I_exhibit

 

 

Hasty Construction – Early Demise: Explosion at Morgan: The World War I Middlesex Munitions Disaster

 

A book detailing the munition depot explosion in New Jersey during WW I, written by Randall Gabrielan, detail the quick build and massive explosive demise of a shell factory built to win World War I.

 

http://blog.nj.com/njv_guest_blog/2013/03/book_review_explosion_at_morgan.html

 

Final Payout to a US Civil War Widow was in 2003

The last payment to a US Civil War widow – which was fought from 1861 thru 1865 – was paid in 2003. This is due to laws which provide benefits to veteran’s spouses and children. The beneficiaries of these benefits cannot be identified by the Government – due to privacy laws – so only whole numbers are reported – if you can find them.

 

Many nations have similar benefits for their veterans.

 

http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htmurph/articles/20130406.aspx

Providing Entertainment to the troops during WW II

The longest front of the war – often known as “The Eastern Front” to those in the West - was a two sided front – the U.S.S.R. sent their entertainers to keep up the moral of their troops.  Alexander Vasilyevich Alexandrov was a composer who took his music to the troops during the Great Patriotic War as it is known in Russia.

 

http://english.pravda.ru/russia/economics/11-04-2013/124252-aleksandr_aleksandrov-0/

Palm Trees at Fort Knox Kentucky

While looking at chimneys on Fort Know you may find etchings of a Palm Tree on them

 

http://www.wkyt.com/news/headlines/Palm-trees-at-Fort-Knox-may-be-German-POW-drawings-201825991.html?ref=991

 

May 9 Victory parade scheduled in Moscow

The annual parade remembering the end of World War 2 –aka Great Patriotic War - this year will include over 11,000 troops.

 

http://www.businessghana.com/portal/news/index.php?op=getNews&news_cat_id=1&id=181180

 

Bullets and Bacilli, a book on medicine in the Spanish American War

More troops died of disease in camps during the US Civil War than in combat (360,000 in camps, 300,000 in combat) and the Spanish-American War three times as many died of disease than in combat.

 

To acclimate the soldiers of Vermont to the Cuban in preparation of The Spanish-American war they were sent to the old battlefield of Chickamauga.

 

“For the northern boys of the First Vermont Infantry, the Civil War nickname for Chickamauga Creek, “River of Death,” became meaningful once again as the National Cemetery had to be reopened to accommodate the bodies ravaged by disease. By June 1, the first death of a Vermont soldier was recorded by the regiment.”

 

http://www.timesargus.com/article/20130415/NEWS01/704159917

 

Love at First Sight – of Airplanes

 

Jack Rude grew up around building models and flying gliders – he trained and B-24s and flew 32 combat missions in a B-17 as part of the 493 BG (H) – and his house is now full of models and artwork.

 

He soloed in a single-engine propeller-driven Fairchild PT-19 before he ever drove a car.

 

http://amarillo.com/news/2013-03-07/wwii-airman-it-was-love-first-flight

 

Last Flyable B-17 in Europe to be at airshow June 9

Flying Fortress G-BEDF, affectionately known as ‘Sally B’, will be at the RAF Cosford air show June 9 in the UK. 

 

http://www.shropshirelive.com/2013/04/12/last-airworthy-b-17-in-europe-lined-up-for-raf-cosford-air-show/

“If these walls could talk . . .” – what about a Horse?

The state branch of the National Boer War Memorial Association wants to install the audio system in a bollard next to the equestrian memorial, which stands at the King William St intersection outside Government House.

 

No “Neigh sayers” allowed.

 

http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/south-australia/plan-to-give-voice-to-horse-in-city-boer-war-memorial/story-e6frea83-1226591322862

 

A Kreige in Stockton California

An Afrika Corps veteran captured in North Africa but held in a POW camp in Stockton passed the time making a little trinket.

 

 

Franz Winter returned to live in Austria after the war but the memento is in Florida.

 

http://www.recordnet.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20130415/A_NEWS0803/304150312

From Dropping Them to Finding Them RAF Photo Sleuths hunt UXBs

The failure rate of aerial bombs was around 5% for the US and British. The US had a lower rate since they routinely put two fuses on all bombs that were 500 lbs or more. That puts the likely total of unexploded bombs (UXBs) at around 250,000 for the war. Now old strike and recon photos are helping to track them down.

 

“They are American, because they’re made of high-alloyed aluminium compounds. British fuses are always made of brass and don’t rust.”

 

The British alone employed 98 different fuses and had 123 types of bombs.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-2300139/World-War-II-How-RAF-helping-destroy-unexploded-wartime-bombs--Germany.html

April 6, 1917: US Declared War on Germany

1914 will be a year full of events in Europe and the Middle East AND Africa where the war was fought.

War of 1812 at the US Naval Academy

Tour the US Naval Academy and also see and learn about the artifacts that will be on display in Annapolis. Tour starts April 1, 2012 thru November 2014. No idea if they are going to re-create the bombardment of Fort McHenry in Baltimore or not.

 

http://www.eyeonannapolis.net/2013/03/11/war-of-1812-exhibit-to-open-at-naval-academy/

 

Protecting Battlefields

US Civil War battlefields are much visible than the 1812 War or 1776 Revolutionary war, but they still need to be protected from development.

 

Rep. Rush Holt (D-NJ) introduced legislation to “authorize the acquisition and protection of nationally significant battlefields and associated sites of the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812 under the American Battlefield Protection Program” (H.R. 1033). Holt introduced the measure on Thursday, March 7.

 

[It passed the US House twice before in each of the last two sessions of Congress, but the Senate never voted on it, nor most anything else, over the last 4 years.]

 

http://www.examiner.com/article/still-trying-to-protect-revolutionary-war-war-of-1812-history

 

Flying Un-Armed into Combat with the Troop Carrier Command

Charles C. English, Sr. died at the age of 97 served in the 9th and 12th AF in the troop carrier commands.

 

Charlie's military activities began with the 62nd Troop Carrier Squadron, 9th and 12th Air Force group as a non-commissioned officer during World War II. His C-47 Squadron dropped supplies and paratroopers in North Africa, Sicily, the Italian mainland and the Northern European Theater including the D-Day invasion of France and the Battle of the Bulge. Mr. English received 9 Battle Stars, Distinguished Unit citation, an Oak Leaf cluster and a belated commendation in 2000 from the French government for the liberation of France.

 

The German military showed the value of airlift during the Spanish Civil War when German JU-52s transported troops from Morocco to Spain to help General Franco, and again in France, North Africa and Russia. But the US produced many times more transports than Germany – and each one had a 4 man crew who flew into combat with only their 45s at their side.

 

http://durham.patch.com/groups/obituaries/p/charles-c-english-longtime-durham-resident-and-world-6f2d96d2f1

 

Tank-less “Desert Rats”

The British 4th and 7th Armored Brigades will now become foot sloggers. They were made famous during the battles in North Africa and acquired the name “Desert Rats”.

 

They now turn in the Challenger tanks for some heavy soled boots.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/desert-rats-lose-tanks-defence-1745342

 

Mossie in Pungo

A fully restored DeHaviland Mosquito is now at its new home at the Military Aviation Museum in Pungo, near Virginia Beach, Va. Its first flight for the American public will be in May at the museum's annual Warbirds Over the Beach Air Show.

 

It took a worldwide search to find all the parts needed. The brakes were found in England, the prop spinners from a fence post in Canada, one of the seats came from Australia, via eBay.

 

http://hamptonroads.com/2013/03/restored-wwii-mosquito-warplane-lands-pungo

 

Producing Tanks – without ever having designed them

As German tanks rolled toward Paris in June 1940, Chrysler President Kaufman Keller received a call from the Office of War Production in Washington:

"Can you make us tanks?" asked the OWP chief.

"Sure," Keller replied, "when can I see one?"

 

By the end of the war Chrysler had produced over 25,000 tanks.

 

http://news.investors.com/management-leaders-in-success/031813-648381-chryslers-kaufman-keller-armed-america-for-war.htm#ixzz2Qavr4XIO

 

Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned The Tide in the Second World WarOregon Chapter News

Next General Membership meeting is May 11, 2013.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 

“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for January 2013

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

Attributed NAZI Quotes – Often Wrong

Lots of time you see quotes in print/web or radio that were supposedly said by a leading NAZI or Hitler himself– but often they were invented and were never made by them. This site has a list of the most (wrongly) famous ones.

 

http://www.ihr.org/other/weber2011fakequotations.html

442 RCT Congressional Gold Medal to go on Tour

Starting January 11, 2013 in New Orleans, the CGM awarded to the 442 Regimental Combat Team is going on a yearlong national tour that will spread the stories of the veterans, their sacrifices and their triumphs. The tour is organized by the Smithsonian in partnership with the National Veterans Network, a coalition of Japanese-American veteran and civic organizations.

 

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/2013/01/ap-congressional-gold-medal-goes-on-national-tour-011113/

 

100th BG Reunion October 17, 2013 in Pooler , South Carolina

The “Bloody 100th” will have their group reunion this year in South Carolina – where the 8th Air Force Museum is at.  Convention hotel is the Embassy Suites. See info on their FaceBook page: https://www.facebook.com/events/493588624033108/permalink/493613400697297/ 

“Keeping The Memories Alive”

Sir, My name is Gus Nathan, Past President of the New York Southern Wing Chapter, 8th AFHS. I am compiling an 8th AF veteran history book, with veteran stories and experiences during WWII in the European Theatre. I would like permission to quote some of your articles and would welcome stories and pictures from your members. The book has been titled, "Keeping the Memories Alive" and 8th Air Corps members, Officers, Enlisted personnel, flight crews, ground crews and administrative personnel are contributing articles and pictures. Each article will contain the by line of the writer and his picture. If you have members interested in keeping the memories alive by putting their experiences in the book, please make sure they send a picture of themselves, in uniform, to me with their chapter. Thank you Gus Nathan 8th AFHS P.O.Box 297 Centuck Station Yonkers, New York 10710. I guarantee each contributor will receive a copy of the book. FYI my telephone number is (914) 439-6883.  Again, my thanks  gusnathan@AOL.com

 

People who were stationed at the 1st AD HQ as part the 8th AF

By way of introduction, my name is Jeff Hawley and I have recently been appointed the 8thAFHS point of contact for the 1st Air Division HQ's here in Brampton, England. http://www.8thafhs.org/unitcontacts.htm    

 

I am also a born and bred Oregonian from Newport so very interested in the Oregon Chapter of the 8thAFHS. 

 

I have been researching the heritage of the 1st Air Division in order to document the activities that occurred there and would be very interested if any of your members or their dependents were attached to the headquarters.  I am also developing a PowerPoint presentation of the 1st history in the UK and when complete I will be making it available to all Chapters.

 

If there is anything that either myself or Gordon Richards (UK Director) can assist you or the Chapter with, please do not hesitate to ask. 

 

Kind Regards, Jeff Hawley; yankee2100 @btinternet.com
(remove the space when copying his email address).

 

[Editor’s note: The combat personnel got almost all the press and the books written about them, but the ground crews who serviced the planes, and the HQ personnel who planned the missions, coordinated the groups, ensured that the supplies were delivered (and the replacement crews) you almost never hear about – nor do you get to read about what they did.)

 

Touring in the Glenn Miller Band

There were people who were in combat, people in the immediate rear areas, support personnel and home front military – and there were some who went all around the world in a moral support role in USO tours including the Glenn Miller Band – which Robert Christoferson was part of playing the trumpet while he was in the US Army Air Force.

 

The new band was assigned a B-24 bomber — with the armament removed and outfitted for the musicians and “We traveled around to all the bases in France, Belgium.”

 

Glenn Miller was lost during a storm flying from England to France in 1944.

 

http://military.blogs.mydesert.com/2012/12/23/world-war-ii-veteran-played-trumpet-in-glenn-millers-band/

 

Stolen Christmas Cards

Every nation’s soldiers sent Christmas cards home – but some 86 German cards were never delivered – they were stolen from a post office in Jersey in 1941 – British island Jersey – and only returned in 2006. Some have now finally been delivered.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/12/19/wwii-christmas-cards-delivered-germany_n_2331216.html

 

With the Arrowhead Division in Italy

The unit symbol of the 5th Division was an Arrowhead – and Sgt “Lucky” Luckasevic went from North Africa to the Invasion at Salerno earning earn four battle stars for the campaigns in Italy.

 

He had many close calls – on a patrol, in a jeep and on ship.

http://triblive.com/neighborhoods/yourmonvalley/yourmonvalleymore/3166440-74/luckasevic-christmas-war#axzz2JzpTGFdY

“I Always wanted to Fly” – a Flight Engineer’s story

John J. Shiver Jr flew 75 combat missions as a gunner or flight engineer and now has published a book about it all.

 

He was part of the 9th, 12th and 15th Air Force all while serving in 98th Bomb Group 344th Sqd. The group was reassigned from AF to AF as they kept creating new Air Forces and altering their roles.

 

Bomber crews in the MTO (North Africa, Italy) often few a minimum of 50 missions before their tour was over.

 

I Always Wanted To Fly: Memoirs of a World War ll Flight Engineer/Gunner (Amazon link)

Writing the history of “Never Satisfied”

This B-17 was flying as part of the 15th Air Force and was shot down over Hungary – and the crew captured. A history buff started talking to the crew and after four years now has a book about their experiences.

 

http://www.journal-news.com/news/news/heritage-hall-curator-releases-first-book-on-wwii/nTbMd/

 

A Combat Medic on Guadalcanal

Originally slated to go to North Africa Sidney “Sid” Savage was instead sent to the South Pacific.

 

“Our first combat was when we went to Guadalcanal to relieve the 1st Marines. When we got off the landing craft, they got on.”

 

“You don’t know what you can do until you have to do it, and you don’t know how much you can take until you have to take it.”

 

Savage spent 592 days in the combat zone, so long that his fellow soldiers started calling him “Doc.”

 

http://www.cantonrep.com/newsnow/x1922387176/WWII-Then-and-Now-Sidney-Sid-Savage-saw-much-suffering-as-a-combat-medic

 

A Pole Farm Museum

Before cell phones and satellite and loads of fiber cables to place calls to Europe and the Mideast - there was an AT&T telephone pole farm that transmitted phone calls to Europe and beyond.

 

http://www.nj.com/mercer/index.ssf/2013/01/lawrence_parks_unique_world_wa.html

 

A Lecture about the war of 1812 and New York

People remember the Battle of New Orleans – thanks to a song and that it was fought after the war was officially over – but lots of battles took place in up-state New York and the Great Lakes. A lecture about it will occur March 6 at Genesee Community College.

http://readme.readmedia.com/GCCs-Announces-the-Spring-2013-Civil-War-Lecture-Series/5242473

Grumman “Duck” Located 40 feet below the Ice in Greenland

The aircraft crashed in November of 1942 while rescuing a crew of a B-17. After an initial rescue and return of two crewmembers it crashed in “white out” conditions coming back with the radioman of the B-17 and was lost.

http://alaska-native-news.com/alaska-native-news-at-sea/7531-wwii-coast-guard-grumman-duck-crash-site-located-in-greenland-after-70-years.html

Flying a P-51 Mustang – at 94 years of age

He was an WW II Air Force pilot – but never got to fly a “Mustang” during the war. He went to Kissimmee and flew the dual place P-51 “Crazy Horse” while there.

http://www.ktva.com/home/outbound-xml-feeds/Flying-High-at-94-Fairbanks-WWII-Vet-Pilots-Fighter-Plane-He-Didnt-Fly-During-the-War-187733291.html?strypg=1

Flying with the 303rd Bombardment Group (Heavy) “Hell’s Angles”

Charles Coon was a pilot flying B-17s in the 360th Squadron of the 303rd Bomb Group – known as “The Hell’s Angels” and had one B-17 blow up on the runway – just after he was able to stop it and get out and run back to where the crew had already jumped out of it – while it was going 30 MPH. That single event make the  newspaper in wartime England.

He has published some of his stories online (links to a PDF) http://prod-admin1.halifax.atex.cniweb.net:8080/polopoly_fs/1.78953.1358202342%21/menu/standard/file/15%20World%20War%20II.pdf

http://www.nwfdailynews.com/local/wwii-vet-shares-his-stories-it-was-like-i-was-in-alice-in-wonderland-except-people-got-hurt-1.78853

Mission Critical – the Weather Officer

What allows modern weather to be so good is all the work and techniques worked out during World War II in order to predict the weather for the Air Force – and the invasions. Those same methods created by the 8th Air Force, 9, 11, 12, 15th & 20th – as well as the others – is still used today but with better equipment than they had.

Owen Brough was the weather officer that allowed FDR to fly and attend the Yalta Conference in 1945.

One day when the fog was starting to roll in, “a lieutenant colonel came in for a weather report. I told him, ‘You better leave in the next 15 or 20 minutes or you won’t get it off the ground.’”

A big plane, with curtains over the windows, sat on the runway ready for take-off.

“It was President (Franklin) Roosevelt. He was going to the Yalta Conference.”

He trained as a meteorologist and spent several months at airfields in Oregon and Washington, and attended weather forecasters school at Chanute Field in Illinois.

http://military.blogs.mydesert.com/2013/01/20/world-war-ii-weather-officer-gave-fdr-the-all-clear-in-tripoli/

Wake Island – A Military defeat that inspired Victory

During the first bleak days of WW II in the Pacific – Wake Island defenders held off the Japanese Navy with 4 Grumman F4F wildcats – and in the process sunk the Japanese destroyer Kisaragi by dive bombing it and aiming for the rear deck – where the depth charges were stored.

The maintenance officer, John F. Kinney was not only fixing the Wildcats but flying combat missions – since all the aircraft mechanics had been killed in the first attack against Wake Island.

 

Wake Island held out for 13 days before surrendering. Only 40% of those who surrendered survived the Japanese POW camps including the 1221 civilians working for the Morrison-Knudsen Company.

http://www.hawaiireporter.com/wake-island-hero-brigadier-general-john-f-kinney-u-s-marine-corps-wwii-and-korean-war-1914-2006/123

British Raid to Amsterdam in 1943 – Disaster for all but one plane

A bombing raid to Amsterdam in 1943 did not go well – when it was spotted by a group of German Pilots at a conference as New Zealand squadron passed by on the way there – and all but one plane of the squadron was shot down.

In 1980 the German pilot who shot down and killed Ailsa Courtts’ husband, called to say he was sorry for shooting him down – they had to comfort him. She is still alive at 100.

The phone call was made possible by a Dutch researcher who gathered information on both the New Zealand 487 Squadron and the German fighter pilots during the mission.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/local-news/8228895/Fighter-pilot-sorry-for-WWII-death

New HBO Series in the Works about the 8th

The producing A-Team of Steven Spielberg, Tom Hanks and Gary Goetzman are regrouping for an adaptation of Donald L. Miller’s Masters of the Air: America's Bomber Boys Who Fought the Air War Against Nazi Germany (Amazon link)

An account of the famous “bomber boys” of the Eighth Air Force, HBO’s source material is likely to prove consistent with the parallel examinations of the ideological perversity of war, and of the fellowship it inspires, which were so prized by audiences in "Band of Brothers."

http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/live-feed/hbo-developing-third-wwii-miniseries-413632

Flying Combat in A-20s, RAF Boston’s and in B-17s

Melvin Jenner started combat as a gunner in A-20 “Havocs” but they ran out of planes and so he went to fly the RAF  in their “Boston” medium bombers, then he was transferred to B-17s in the 452 Bombardment Group (Heavy) and flew 30 missions with them.

 

“Every time we went on a mission we had a camera,” Jenner said, “and sometimes if we didn’t have a bunch of fighters on us, I might just stick the camera out the window and shoot.

 

“That time when Oscar went down, he had looked at me and waved his guns, acknowledging that he had seen me. I turned around to do something, and when I turned around again, I saw the wing of his airplane go by. He was hit by anti-aircraft.”

 

He remembers the date, March 28, 1944, and the mission, to bomb a small target, Chateaudun in France, which was being used as a German military airfield.

 

http://www.wotimes.com/articles/2013/01/23/news/top_stories/news01.txt

 

 

American Field Service Ambulance Drivers

An unknown part of WW II was there were many Americans who went overseas as Ambulance Drivers – just like in World War I – before the US entered the war. And most severed throughout the war in the various allied armies – but 36 were killed in Action – including Henry Larner.

The History of the American Field Service, 1920-1955,  is a book about this little known unit. (Amazon link)

http://www.timesunion.com/local/article/Letters-circa-WWII-reveal-tragic-journey-4226249.php#page-1

Middle Rank Officers saw both sides of a Battle

Maj. General Price-Davies saw action in the Boer war but as a mid-level officer in the 48th Welsh division he saw a complete disconnect as to what is happening at the front and what the Generals though was going on dozens of miles in the rear. British Generals rarely lead from the front in WW I – and relied on runners and did not adapt to using modern telephone and aircraft recon abilities till after the Somme Battle of July 1916 – where they lost 50,000+ troops on the first day.

Letters home by Price-Davies vent his frustration with those realities of 1916.

ellmount Military Memoirs: The Letters of Major General Price Davies VC, CB, CMG, DSO: From Captain to Major General, 1914-18 (Amazon link)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-21228935

Making the Equipment that made Victory Possible

There are “big idea people” and then there are the people who engineer the ideas into reality. A new book out is about the people who came up with the ideas and turned them into working practical combat methods.

Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned The Tide in the Second World War  (Amazon link) by Paul Kennedy.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/books/non_fictionreviews/9826648/Engineers-of-Victory-by-Paul-Kennedy-review.html

 

A Staff Sergeant Bombardier

William R. Houns was a Staff Sergeant and was assigned to Polebrook where the 351st BG (H) was at – and became a bombardier – sometimes known as a toggler – since he toggled the bombs by watching when the lead squadron plane dropped their bombs. He died at the age of 90 in January.

His first mission was on Christmas day 1944.

http://www.leadertelegram.com/people/obituaries/article_5720874c-f1b1-5fe5-b363-1c8db7c9ba6b.html

Claude W Reece flying “Unstable Mablel”

Assigned to 389th BG (H) flying B-24 Liberators out of Hethel as part of the 8th Air Force, he flew 30 missions over Europe including one where three of the four engines in the B-24 were shot away and landed on the remaining engine running in Belgium.

He was one of the pilots who went overseas in late 1943.

(Editor’s note: You can estimate when a person went overseas by looking at the number of missions flow when they finished their “tour”. 25 missions means they went over sometime in 1942 to mid-1943; 30 missions from mid-1943 till mid-1944, 35 missions thereafter. As the war progressed they upped the mission count required to complete a tour.  I don’t know the exact dates when the count was “upped” by the 8th Air Force.)

Engineers of Victory: The Problem Solvers Who Turned The Tide in the Second World WarOregon Chapter News

Membership Status & Annual Membership Renewal

The membership renewal letter was sent recently.

The Oregon Chapter annual dues are $15 a year. People who have presented to the chapter are automatically granted membership for a full year.

 

Currently the chapter continues to send to people meeting notifications and information to people who have NOT paid their dues for two years before they are officially dropped from the roster. After two years all those in non-paid status are dropped from the official roster.

 

Please check with Sharon Campbell if you are unsure of your membership status at 503-632-7633.

 

When a member dies the chapter continues to send notifications for a year after being notified of their death, unless otherwise requested.

 

Next General Membership meeting is February 9, 2013.

PROGRAM: Tuskegee bomber trainee Ben “Flaps” Berry

The Tuskegee airmen are most known for the fighter squadrons that flew as part of the 15th AF in North Africa and Italy – but in 1944/1945 a medium bomber unit was also being formed for deployment and Mr. Berry was part of that group of airmen being trained for combat in WW II. The unit was never deployed due to the ending of the war. Mr. Berry went on to work for NASA and was part of the Apollo program.

Mr. Berry will be the featured speaker talking about his time during WW II as well as his time as an engineer with NASA.

 

He has published a book called TUSKEGEE AIRMEN -- To the Moon, Mars and Beyond: (Secrets Revealed)

 

Congress authorized a Congressional Gold Medal in honor of those were part of the “Tuskegee Experiment” during WW II on April 11, 2006. Only 1 medal is actually struck per award (except for the 1980 Olympic participants) and the metal will be on tour around the USA in 2013 – starting at the National WW II Museum in New Orleans. People who are part of the group which get the award, like the women who were part of the WASPs, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team (Neisi) , can buy copies of the medal from the National Mint http://www.usmint.gov so they can have a copy. Course the original metal is made out of real Gold and the copies are not.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

 

“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News for December 2012

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

Capt Walter “Wally” Groce – 56th Fighter Group

Wally was a local member of the 8th AFHS of Oregon; he died on November 17, 2012. Capt Groce flew his first combat mission on 14 August 1944 attacking rail and ground targets in Eastern France in a Republic P-47 as part of “Zemke’s Wolfpack”. The only fighter group that kept the P-47 (except for a short three week period) during their combat in the 8th Air Force. One of his gun clips appeared in an 8th AF movie #3 in 1945.

Wally was shot down a Me-262 but was only given ½ credit because a P-51 Mustang pilot also claimed it – he shot at it after Wally had already caused it to go down. He made a head-on pass at it and shot off the starboard wingtip – you can see it in his gun camera film. He also shot down Heinkel He-111, Messerschmitt Bf-109, and a Focke-Wulf Fw-190.

The film leader on his gun camera film (he had all his original film) from the Me-262 engagement.

 

 

The bullet strike on the wingtip of the Me-262 from his Wally’s P47 .50 caliber guns.

The German pilot bailed out – but was killed in another Me-262 three days later.

 

His service is set for 5 January 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Young's Funeral Home (http://www.youngsfuneralhome.org/dm20/en_US/locations/73/7398/index.page ) on Hwy 99 in Tigard, two blocks west of Hwy 217.

 

Allen J. Chapin – 1st Schweinfurt Mission – Kriegie

Lt Col Chapin died at the age of 90 on October 1, 2012. He is buried at Willamette National Cemetery in Oregon. He was flying a Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress in the 381 Bombardment Group (Heavy), 535 Squadron, when he was shot down on 17 August 1943 on the way to bomb the Schweinfurt ball bearing factory. He spent the rest of the war as a POW. His view of the mission is well documented in a few books as well as in our local chapter archives.

 

Capt. William Riegler – 39 Missions in a B-17

Flying in the 613 Bomb Squadron of the 401 Bombardment Group (Heavy) in Boeing B-17 ‘Flying Fortress’ the plane he flew over to join the 8th Air Force was called “Pistol Packin’ Momma”.

Once, he looked into an enemy pilot’s eyes.

"I couldn’t tell you if they were blue or brown, but I could see them", recalled Riegler, who remembered seeing the flashes of the enemy aircraft’s guns and tracer fire. "It was my fifth mission. I thought, ‘This is it.’ "

http://www.cantonrep.com/carousel/x1784769167/World-War-II-Then-and-Now-39-missions?zc_p=0

 

Len Heller – P-47 Mechanic

He arrived in England in 1943 and supported the Thunderbolts there – but on June 9, 1944 he was in Normandy setting up the first air base on the continent where his unit’s P-47s were to operate out of.

 http://www.mydesert.com/article/20120923/NEWS13/309230033/Mechanic-lent-hand-WWII-invasion?odyssey=mod_sectionstories&nclick_check=1

 

The Higgins Boat

The Higgins Boat was a revolutionary landing craft, made of mahogany with steel armor plating, designed and built by Andrew Jackson Higgins on the Mississippi River and tested on Lake Pontchartrain, just above New Orleans.

http://www.voanews.com/content/invention-that-won-world-war-ll-showcased/1513924.html

 

The Corregidor Tunnel Photograph

 Finance Department and Signal Corps, Lateral #12, Malinta Tunnel, Fort Mills, Corregidor, Philippine Islands, April 24, 1942. Photo by Major Paul R. Wing, 228th Signal Operations Company.

 

Dwight E. Gard, seated fourth from the left grew up in Bend, Oregon.

http://blog.oregonlive.com/oregonatwar/2012/11/a_backstory_about_portland_ban.html

Last Reunion of the 12th Bombardment Group at Joint Base McCord-Lewis

The last, reunion of the 12th Bombardment Group (Medium) was held in October in Washington State at McCord air base. The unit consisted of the 81st, 82nd, 83rd and 434th squadrons. The reunion welcomed back a few original members of the group, like 91-year-old retired Lt. Col. Jim Miller, a number of widows, friends and well-wishers. They flew B-25 “Mitchell” bombers.

http://www.army.mil/article/88660/Army_Air_Corps_pilots_hold_final_reunion_at_Lewis_McChord/

 

Napoleonic Era Soldiers Re-buried

Remains of soldiers killed in Russia were re-buried outside Minsk on November 2, 2012. They were killed in November of 1812 as they retreated out of Russia.

Meanwhile in Belgium, their Archeological Service found the remains of a soldier buried at Waterloo in June – with the grapeshot ball that killed him.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/02/napoleonic-soldiers-buried_n_2065770.html#slide=1714754

 

Seen in a PowerPoint Slide

“There is no Bullet List like Stalin’s Bullet list.”

http://www.edwardtufte.com/tufte/powerpoint

 

Sci-Fi and Naval Warfare

Q: Has sci-fi affected the way that our navies conduct warfare?

A: This is a question that I occasionally think about. Many people point to the development of the shipboard Combat Information Center in World War II as being inspired by E.E. Doc Smith's Lensman novels from the 1940s. Smith realized that with hundreds of ships over huge expanses, the mere act of coordinating them was problematic. I think there is a synergistic effect. I also know a number of naval officers who have admitted to me that the reason they joined the Navy was because Starfleet Command wasn't hiring.

 http://bdtonline.com/washingtonpost/x403306813/Foreign-Policy-Battlestar-Galactica-got-space-warfare-right-Finally

 

The Flight Surgeon for the 306th Bombardment Group

Thurman Shuller of McAlester joined the Army in July of 1941 expecting to be in only a year, but Pearl Harbor and the 8th Air Force changed that. Initially assigned to Las Vegas air base, he was advised to go into aviation medicine and ended up as the 369th Squadron flight surgeon of 306th BG stationed at Thurleigh, England.

 He wrote a report, citing and quoting Major General Ira Eaker, stating that crew should fly no more than 20 missions as their tour. Three weeks later it was official – 25 missions were the number of missions a crew must fly to complete their combat tour.

 At the time the average life expectancy of a crew was 15 missions. During one 9 month period the overall causality rate of the 306th BG was 100%.

http://mcalesternews.com/features/x880894140/McAlester-veteran-Dr-Thurman-Shuller-a-World-War-2-hero

Parachuting off of Formosa

Not all planes were lost due to combat – friendly planes colliding in formation were actually “routine” in combat zones. The British expected to lose at least two planes a mission due to planes colliding at night.  Robert Withee was a P-51 pilot who had to bail out when he turned his P-51 Mustang – and his wingman did not and both became members of the Caterpillar Club. Robert flew over 200 combat missions in the Pacific.

 http://www.cantonrep.com/carousel/x970312231/World-War-II-Bob-Withee-flew-200-flights-over-the-Pacific-in-P-40s-and-P-51s

 

Sinking Fast – Last vets of WW II Subs meet Regularly in Texas

One of most exclusive clubs of Veterans are the WW II submariners. At the Golden Corral in Fort Worth Texas some of those that are left still meet.

“The Pargo had just blasted a Japanese tanker in half with torpedoes when it endured the most frightening barrage of depth charges from a Japanese frigate that Hewett had ever experienced. The Pargo usually evaded at 300 feet of water but was caught in only about 180 feet.

The submarine survived at least 24 depth charges, he said.

"We were really rocked around," Hewett said. "I can tell you, I gave up. I thought we were gone for sure. My prayers were for my folks."

But the boat survived. Hewett and his shipmates waited for another string of depth charges, sure to be fatal, but it never happened.

"I have surmised that they ran out," Hewett said. "They just didn't have any more, and we managed to get away."

http://www.mcclatchydc.com/2012/11/26/175512/texas-world-war-ii-submariners.html#storylink=cpy

 

Ralph Burbridge - aboard the "All American" on February 1, 1943

Assigned as a bombardier to a B-17 in the 97 Bombardment Group (Heavy) 414th Squadron; they flew in a B-17 they had named “The All American”. While on a mission to Tunis docks they also flew into one of the most famous photos of the war of a B-17.

 "… about halfway through his roll either my fire or fire from the lead ship must have killed the pilot or disabled the plane. He never completed his intended roll and rapid pass under our ship."

"WHOOMP!"

"For one horrible instant he was right there – inches in front and above us. He passed over us with a distinctly audible swoosh," over the roar of the B-17’s Wright Cyclone engines, "followed by a tremendous jar and a ‘whoomp.’"

 http://b-townblog.com/2012/09/21/local-b-17-bombardier-recalls-wing-and-a-prayer-mission-on-the-all-american/

 

Bailing out of a “Mickey” B-17

Bill Shelton was 17 when he joined the Army with goal of being a pilot – but like many goals he ended up as a tail-gunner of a Boeing B-17 as a replacement crew in 1943 in the 96 BG (H) at Snetterton, England.

"At Wichita Falls they came in and asked for guys to volunteer to be gunners. It was a five-week course and you made buck sergeant after five weeks. There was no other way you could earn three stripes in five weeks."

 He was shot down on May 8, 1944.

 http://enidnews.com/localnews/x880894607/Surviving-World-War-II

 

Speaking Code and Making Cyphers in the 83 Group Control

Joining the RAF on his 18th birthday in 1942, Bernard Morgan, was part of the “rear area” people supporting the RAF – until he landed on Gold Beach on June 6, 1944.

 http://www.crewechronicle.co.uk/crewe-news/local-crewe-news/2012/11/07/crewe-war-veteran-bernard-morgan-reflects-on-his-raf-experiences-during-world-war-two-96135-32178604/

 

P-38D pieces found at an old crash site

After taking off from Selfridge Field, where the 94th Pursuit Squadron was based, 2nd Lt. Albert Voss bailed out of the P-38 Lightening but was killed due to the low altitude of his bailout, and the plane crashed into a field. Now Jim Clary is finding pieces of that crash.

http://www.dailytribune.com/article/20121111/NEWS01/121119958/wwii-artifacts-found-at-1941-plane-crash-site-in-richmond#full_story

 

John Demlein -- Operation Aphrodite Pilot

Drone aircraft are not new – they were made and used by both the Allied and Axis powers. Navy flying John Demlein was assigned to the Navy’s version of the Aphrodite project to fly war weary B-24s into heavily fortified German naval bases to destroy them by remote control. This is the project in which Joseph P. Kennedy Jr., was killed when the B-24 he was flying blew up to due faulty wiring of the on-board explosives.

http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2012/11/former_world_war_ii_navy_john.html

 

WW II Era Busses Soldier on – in Myanmar (Burma)

A Canada-built Chevy C-15 – built and used during the Burma campaign during WW II, still carries passengers in 2012 – 73 years after it was built and shipped off to move troops and supplies during WW II in the CBI Theatre of war. But their time may send them to the scrap heap – or a museum.

http://worldnews.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/11/26/15447661-end-of-an-era-myanmars-big-belly-chevy-buses-from-wwii-face-scrap?lite

 

In the Front Line with Anti-Aircraft Artillery

Assigned to Battery C of the 457th Anti-Aircraft Artillery Battalion he landed on D-Day “Plus one” at Omaha beach – and then fought across Europe ending up being wounded in Germany – but was reported as being killed in action. The unit was credited with shooting down 43 enemy aircraft.

http://www.buffalonews.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20121125/CITYANDREGION/121129511/1010

Lt. Col. Herbert Eugene Carter -- dead at 95

One of the original members of the Tuskegee Airmen, he flew 77 combat missions and only had to land without using his wheels of his aircraft once. He was one of the advisiors to George Lucas on the movie “Red Tails”.

He died on November 8 East Alabama Medical Center in Opelika.

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Original-member-of-the-Tuskegee-Airmen-dies-at-95-4023283.php

 

Clayton Melvin Hays – P-51 Mustang Pilot

Flying out of Italy with the 15th Air Force, a fellow pilot dropped his drop tanks – into Hay’s aircraft and almost shot him down. He aborted and flew back to the Island of Vis.

"They told me I’d tear up the metal runway. They said I should bail out into the ocean. They’d pick me up. I looked around. I didn’t see any boats out there. Also, I couldn’t swim. I went in to land, with my wheels down, at 165 miles per hour."

 He went back to Vis this year – as a tourist.

 http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2012/11/a_northwest_portland_world_war.html

 

Leutnant Gottfried Dulias JG-53 "Ace of Spades" ME-109G Fighter Pilot

After the war not all Luftwaffe pilots stayed in Germany – some came to the USA. During a “Battle of the Bulge” re-enactment in 2009 a re-enactor met a Luftwaffe pilot at the re-enactment. Lt. Dulias also wrote a book about his life during the NAZI era and his time as a pilot – before he was shot down and captured.

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5174WYQHY0L._SL75_.jpgAnother Bowl of Kapusta: The True Life Story Of A World War II Luftwaffe Fighter Pilot and P.O.W. in Russia

http://www.soldiersandsailors.us/gottfried%20dulias.htm

  

52 Missions in a B-25

Assigned to the 12th Bomb Group (Medium) he was sent to be part of the 9th Air Force in North Africa in 1942. For the next year he flew missions in a B-25 Mitchell bomber they named “Desert Warrior” supporting the British 8th Army. The US army was 800 miles away in Tunisia. 

http://heraldnet.com/article/20121111/NEWS01/711119929/-1/news01

 

Bailing out at night over Indo-China from a B-24

Assigned to the 375 Bomb Squadron with the 14th Air Force – Flying Tigers -- they were originally assigned to go on mission 116 to the Philippines but instead were assigned to bomb a Japanese convoy. Flying in a B-24 named “Hilo Hattie”. Several were shot down by heavy anti-aircraft fire from the ships during the attack.

Low on fuel on the return trip flying back to base at night "I knew two things: We were flying over enemy territory and we were in mountains 18,000 feet high." They bailed out.

http://www.silive.com/news/index.ssf/2012/11/staten_island_war_hero_recount.html

Escaping from Occupied France – Code Name Burgundy

Shot down on the way to Frankfurt in March of 1944, he is captured, then freed from captivity by the French Underground – and with broken ankles, ribs, makes it across France into Spain – over the Pyrenees.

http://www.boston.com/news/local/massachusetts/2012/11/11/haverhill-wwii-veteran-shares-memories-long-escape/CWE42Yb5uItJwc871Di45K/story.html

Flying in “Canvas Coffins”

Glider Infantry pilots have the training as pilots – but once they landed they became infantry officers and fought on the ground – and had the dangers on both ends of the scale.

"They said you had to be half crazy to get on one of those and I said: 'Well, I meet the qualifications.'"

Clinton Riddle was one of those pilots in the 325th Glider Infantry Regiment of the 82nd Airborne Division landing on D-Day as well as Market Garden and the Rhine Crossing.

http://www.timesfreepress.com/news/2012/nov/11/wwii-vet-flew-canvas-coffins/

 

Field Marshall’s Montgomery letter to the Troops

Just like General Eisenhower’s letter, the British General, who was actually the Ground Commander of All Forces on D-Day and for the weeks immediately afterwards, sent his own letter to the British and Canadian troops on D-Day, June 6, 1944. In an antique store he bought a book – and out of the book fell a hand-signed D-Day letter by the General himself – signed on 5 June 1944.

 http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2230551/Montgomerys-note-British-forces-eve-D-Day-charity-shop-book.html

 

A 22 Mile “Sniper” shot

Sniping enemy soldiers has been going on eons – using specialized troops and weapons to kill enemies has been around for over 2500 years. Archery experts were used till the invention of gunpowder and then the art was passed onto them. During the US Revolutionary War, and then again during the US Civil War, gifted riflemen were recruited into snipers. Scopes mounted on rifles were used during the Civil War.

In Afghanistan they have started to use GPS guided artillery as a “sniping” weapon – and achieved a 22 mile single round hit against an enemy group with a 155 mm howitzer.

http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/news/2012/06/marine-record-setting-long-shot-artillery-strike-m777-063012w/

 

Making War Movies – The Early Years

The invention of movie film – 35mm sized – allowed movie cameras to become mobile – though at 15 to 20 pounds they were still not very moved and were hand cranked. However, that did not stop people from making movies about war – either on the field as it often happened or on a movie set.

http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/history/2012/11/the-early-history-of-faking-war-on-film/

Marine Corps Activates the Marine Fighter Attack Squadron 121 with F-35B aircraft

The newly activated unit is based out of Yuma Arizona. The F-35 replaces the F-18 and the AV8B “Harrier” that the Marines currently use.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/11/20/marine-fighter-attack-squadron-121_n_2164586.html

 

A Staff Officer in the Afrika Corps

Gerhard Hennes was a signals officer and fought in WW II in Poland, France and in North Africa – where he was captured. He now lives in Fredericksburg, Va. He has written two books about his wartime experience.

http://oakridgetoday.com/2012/11/15/german-vet-at-roane-state-thursday-nov-15/

http://www.oakridger.com/article/20121126/NEWS/121129930#art-tit

 

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.


“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society
History News Update for November 2012

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.
 

Last member of the 79th Reconnaissance Troop

Visiting his old base for the first time since the summer of 1942, Leon Tarter visited Camp Atterbury Indiana and talked with current soldiers there. He volunteered to drive trucks and on his 2nd day in the Army they gave him a wheelbarrow to pick up trash on the base.
 
 

Visiting the Air Force Museum's B-24

Rick Liblong went to Dayton and brought back memories of his father telling him about the B-24 that crashed on a test flight in Altmond in 1944.
 
 

Breaking a 70 Year old Pigeon Code

Found during a renovation of a chimney, pigeon parts rained down which included a leg with a red capsule on it carrying a secret encoded message. Some 100,000 pigeons flew missions in World War I, and 250,000 in World War II.
 
 

November 7, 1941 Red Square Parade Remembered

Partially recreating the Parade that was held on November 7, 1941, during the Battle of Moscow, T-34s and men in 1941 era uniforms will again be in Red Square.
 
 

The Stalingrad Protocols

Hidden in archives during and for decades afte the war, by USSR officials, detailed first hand unvarnished accounts of the Battle of Stalingrad are slowly being revealed.
 
Vasily Zaytsev had documented claims to have shot dead 242 Germans during the battle, was the army's top sniper. "You often have to remember and memory has a powerful impact." he recalls one year afterwards in an interview, "Now I have unsteady nerves and I'm constantly shaking." PTSD before it was known as that. He was wounded during the battle multiple times but was taken out of combat due to a bad injury in November of 1942.
 
 
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51xCmB9J3HL._SL110_.jpg NOTES OF A RUSSIAN SNIPER is the current book in print that was translated from the book he wrote in 1956 (Amazon Link)
 
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51puOVKNBoL._SL110_.jpg SNIPER ON THE EASTERN FRONT  to see how a German sniper fought from 1943 till the end of the war. (Amazon link)
What is remarkable is that both of the fell into the sniper role by accident.

Last Pilot of the Normandie-Niemen Unit Dies

Count Roland de la Poype, who recently died at the age of 92, was one of the first to join the Unit that was formed from French pilots who fought against the Germans - in the USSR - flying Yak fighters. He completed over 200 missions during WW II.
 
 

Telling a Joke in the Third Reich

In the Third Reich telling a joke was dangerous - not only did you have to have your timing down but whom you told it to - or overheard you - could get you killed.
 

Documenting the Holocaust in the USSR one town at Time

When NAZI Germany invaded the USSR on June 21, 1941, there were independent units assigned whose job was to find and kills the Jews that lived in the USSR - not to ship them anywhere. The Rev. Patrick Desbois, based out of Paris, travels in the former USSR and now independent countries, talking to the oldest people he can find who live in towns where Jewish people used to live to chronicle what happened to them due to the Eisenstaedt Groups that the NAZIs deployed.
 

The Burma Spitfires Tale Continues - Online WW II Game owner funded the Quest

Victor Kislyi, who lives in Belarus, started the WW II online game "World of Tanks" and is the one who funded the quest to find the Spitfires that were buried in Burma near the end of WW II. World of Tanks, which was created in 2010, has 40 million registered players, fighting Second World War-style tank battles against each other online. A new game, World of Warplanes, is due to be released within the first few month of 2013.
 

El Alamein Battle Remembered - 70 Years on

General Montgomery, later Field Marshall Montgomery, was appointed to lead the British 8th Army after being driven into Egypt in mid-1942. And he promptly refused to fight any offensive battles till he had an overwhelming number of men, and supplies so that he would not lose. The defensive battle at El Alamein which the British won in November of 1942, was followed up by the, offensive battle that eventually pushed the Afrika Corps out of Afrika by May of 1943.
 

New German film explores the Relationship between Rommel and Hitler

This new German TV film alters the current established portrayal of Field Marshall Rommel in a revisionist way to show he exploited his tactical battlefield ability to become a General and was not at all involved in the July 20, 1944 plot to kill Hitler.
 
 

10 Little Known Facts about Benito Mussolini

90 Years ago Mussolini, through multiple methods, he able to legitimately gain charge of Italy.
 
 

National WW II Museum Opens a section on Kriegies

When allied soldiers were captured by the Germans they were sent to POW camps and the name "Kriegie" short for the German word Kriegsgefangener - they applied to themselves.
Now through July 7, 2013 the display will be up in the New Orleans museum before being moved to a permanent pavilion.
 
 

The Boer War – A mostly Forgotten War

In the USA the Korean War is the most “forgotten war” but each nation has their own. For Australians it is usually the Boer War of 1899 thru 1902.
 

A Patch of Land in Douglas County and the Spanish American War

Some land has been used for military training for thousands of years – some stay for a few months and go away, some for a few years and then go away. Douglas County Georgia has a road corner relating to the Spanish American War of 1898. The state of Georgia had more camps than any other state with twenty-five different training facilities.

Pin Up Nose Art - A Very American thing in WW II England

When the 8th Air Force moved to England with the B-17E Flying Fortress heavy bomber most of them carried risqué nose art - and it flourished.
 
"As a rule the ground crew worked on a plane 10 hours to every one flown. Ground crews were naturally very possessive of the machines in their care. Some units had the pilot's art on the left side and the ground crew's on the right."
 
Planes that were thought to have minds of their own were called names like "Shedonnawanna".
 
A movie about this is called "Nose Art and Pin-Ups” on SDVD. They are on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nose-Art-Films/
 
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51nXFsNWqoL._SL110_.jpgNose Art and Pin Ups  (Amazon link)
 
 
 

British Combat Veterans run "Op Nightingale Archaeological Project"

This project was started to help veterans both physically and mentally after combat - and now they have uncovered a B-24, British code AL595 B-24, that crashed in November of 1942.
 

Honoring Veterans from all Wars in Texas

Each nation honors their veterans in many ways. A new method created by Rep. Johnson of Texas, is the Congressional Veteran Commendation (CVC) created in 2010.
 
One of those honored was Lt. General Richard E. Carey who related a story from Korea:
"I spent two tours in Korea," he recalled. "On the first tour, I was a grunt [infantryman] in G Company, 3rd Battalion, 1st Marines with [legendary general] Chesty Puller. I was on our advance team in strike force to take over Seoul. We were riding on tanks when Douglas MacArthur came walking up the road amidst all the bullets striking everywhere. We were in an ambush and I pulled him into our cover, and he fell down. He was in all his regalia so he was kind of ticked off, you know. He said, 'Lieutenant, what do you think you are doing?' I said, 'I'm trying to keep you from being killed.' And he said, 'Lieutenant, the bullet isn't made that can kill me!' And he was right. He never got killed."
 

Wall of Hero’s in Gloucester New Jersey

The Wall of Heroes honors the Gloucester County men and women who were killed in action or missing in action while serving in the U.S. military protecting our freedoms and rights.
 
 

Brothers in a B-24

One was assigned to an Infantry unit, the other as a gunner on a B-24 in Italy. But their mother wrote to the head of the Army and got the infantry man assigned to his brothers unit!
 
 

To War with a Typewriter

Not everyone puts bullets at the enemy in war. In fact, during WW II about 7 US soldiers were behind every man in the front line (For the US there were usually 16,000 in an Infantry division, around 4,200 were infantry/artillery men, rest support), some countries had 4 to 1 the Germans averaged around 6 to 1 in the rear areas. Claude R. "Red" Canup went to war in 1944 and since he was a reporter/writer before the war, that is what he did during the war. All his notes were almost destroyed by a leaky refrigerator.
 
He kept copies of all his dispatches and they are now in a book.
"War Is Not Just for Heroes: World War II Dispatches and Letters of U.S. Marine Corps Combat Correspondent Claude R. 'Red' Canup" was published by University of South Carolina Press.
 
The book holds the only publicly available complete collection of dispatches from the era.
 
 
Note to all: don’t store papers in a basement; store paper above the ground floor or higher!!
 

8 British Airmen buried in Malaysia

Their cargo aircraft crashed in 1945, discovered in 1991, and finally excavated in 2009. Geoffrey Dovey, 83, the brother of one crewman was on hand to pay his respects.
 

Recovered from an Glacier in the Alps

After the war not all servicemen went home. The 8th AF started a mapping program to completely photograph all of Europe (outside of Russian control) and people still died in accidents. Army Tech. Sgt. William S. Cassell was killed in 1947 while in a B-17 and only after the glacier had moved down, and then melted, was his remains identified and returned this year.
 

Sendai Airport closed due to a UXB

Construction workers repairing a runway area found a 500 lb. WW II bomb which forced a closure of the airport. During WW II Sendai Army Flight School was based there.
 
 

War Photography on Display at Museum of Fine Arts in Houston

Since the first photographs were taken on a battlefield during The Crimea War, the ability to bring to the masses the recent or actual scenes of combat was steadily escalated. However picking what images to actually display has never been easy.
 
"After Hitler invaded Russia, Leicas weren’t readily available, so many Soviet photographers relied on the FED, the Soviet equivalent. Yet Zelma always used Leicas. How he obtained them isn’t precisely clear, but “the way many photographers got Leicas,” Ms. Tucker said, “was taking them off a dead German.”
 
 

RAR Soldier is awarded the Victoria Cross

Corporal Daniel Keighran, 6th Battalion RAR, was awarded due to his actions in August 24, of 2010. He was the 99th Australian soldier to be awarded the VC since its inception.
VC awarded to Australian servicemen:
Boer War 6
World War I 64
North Russia 2 [1]
World War II 20
Vietnam 4
Afghanistan 3 [2]
1.Often counted in First World War figures
2.As of November 1 2012
 
From 1918 till 1920 various nations fought in North Russia during the Russian Revolution – including many US soldiers.
 
 

Tracking VC Graves with an Tablet Computer

George Taylor, a 12 year old with a penchant for history, found that local VC recipient graves were becoming derelict – so he has become part of The Victoria Cross Trust Charity to track down the derelict graves of VC holders – and donate money every month to them to have the graves restored.
 
 

The Drummer Boy of Ft McHenry

During the Battle of Ft McHenry during the War of 1812 Henry Lightner, a drummer, sounded the alarm of approaching British troops on Sept. 11, 1814. He died in 1883 and was buried in Baltimore; he finally gets a headstone to mark his grave.
 
 

1st Air Commando Combat Medic in the CBI

Karl Schmidt was drafted into the Army Air Corps in 1942 and was stationed in Florida as part of warning information centers when he volunteered for an assignment in a “hot, humid, climate” – and ended up in Burma in “Project 9”.

“The head doctor of our medical unit actually wrote a book called 'Air Commando Doc' about what we were doing in the CBI.”

Amazon does have it: Air commando doc,

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article/20121102/ARTICLE/121109930   

Oregon Chapter News

Membership Status & Annual Membership Renewal

The membership renewal letter was sent recently.

The Oregon Chapter annual dues are $15 a year. People who have presented to the chapter are automatically granted membership for a full year.
 
Currently the chapter continues to send to people meeting notifications and information to people who have NOT paid their dues for two years before they are officially dropped from the roster. The yearly dues statements (except for those life members) will be coming out after the November meeting.
 
Please check with Sharon Campbell if you are unsure of your membership status at 503-632-7633.
 
When a member dies the chapter continues to send notifications for a year after being notified of their death.
 
Next General Membership meeting is February 9, 2013.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.
 
Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.
 
Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon
Tom Philo
17502 SW Kimmel Ct
Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877
 
 
The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News Update for October 2012

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

No National WW I Memorial in Washington DC – Yet

There is a “National” memorial in Kansas – but people just don’t visit it much. Since the USA did not join the war till 1917, there is still time to get one built before then.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/districts-world-war-i-memorial-will-not-be-national-memorial/2012/09/12/60ecc088-fce8-11e1-8adc-499661afe377_story.html

Battle of the Memorial Plaque

Memorial plaques placed years ago, and then moved when an organization/company goes away, create problems as to who “owns” the plaque and where it will reside.  This is the problem in Bittersville, Pa. (Portland Oregon has this problem with the Memorial Coliseum where the memorial  is located on a lower level, which no one can easily find, get to, or see.  Is the COLISEUM there to honor veterans and the memorial attached to it, or is the memorial there and the coliseum attached to the memorial? The distinction makes a difference if you want to tear down the coliseum. )

http://www.yorkdispatch.com/ci_21533638/battle-over-veterans-plaque-boils-over-bittersville

A Motorcycle MP in WW II – Guarding Eisenhower, POWs, and USO Tours

Gene Stephens was in the military before the war – and rode a motorcycle with duties including London m, North Africa to Rome during WW II. He is the guest of honor at Fort Leonard Wood in September.

http://www.armytimes.com/news/2012/09/ap-army-leonard-wood-world-war-ii-mp-94-honored-091012/

Fort Devens Musuem

Camp, later Fort Devens, main function was training soldiers during WW I. Since then it had other assignments, including housing POWs during WW II, till it was closed in 1996.

INFO: 978-772-1286; www.fortdevensmuseum.org

http://www.metrowestdailynews.com/news/x1526497703/Local-Gem-Fort-Devens-Museum-packs-in-history?zc_p=1

WW II Soviet Era Veterans Living in the Ukraine Get Benefits

A bill to change their status, so that they qualify for Social Benefits, takes effect on January 1, 2013.

http://en.for-ua.com/news/2012/08/22/154452.html

National Archives releases documents about Katyn Forrest Massacre

After the Soviet Union joined with NAZI Germany in dividing Poland between the two of them Stalin had a lot of the captured Polish leaders and most of the Polish officers they had captured killed. The Germans discovered this in 1943 and advertised it to the world – which the US and Soviet Governments stated was pure propaganda – but it wasn’t. Over 22,000 Polish were killed by the Soviets in 1940.

http://io9.com/5942180/released-documents-show-us-helped-hush-soviet-massacre-of-thousands

Landmines of WW II still abound in Egypt

When the mobile battles in the desert stopped – each side planted thousands of mines in front of their own units to augment their defensive positions – and they are still being found.  The problem in the desert is of course that landmarks are few and even though the minefields were well documented – sand can cover and obscure everything. Since the end of the war in the El Alamein area over 2.9 MILLION mines and unexploded ordnance items have been removed.

http://www.warhistoryonline.com/featured-article/nazi-landmines-block-egypts-access-to-oil-and-gas.html

Railroading through North Africa, Italy and France

Pfc George Rodak wanted to be in the Army Air Corps – but his pre-war locomotive talents sent him to the Army Railroad units in Europe instead.

http://www.cantonrep.com/carousel/x1107514678/WORLD-WAR-II-Then-and-Now-Pfc-George-Rodak

Last Pilot Standing – Captain Ken Cochran

He thinks he is the last pilot alive from his B-24 group from the south Pacific. He flew 30 combat missions.

http://www.ktbs.com/news/Ken-Cochran-World-War-II-B-24-Pilot/-/144844/16599280/-/115sbt7/-/index.html

A B-24 – Surviving Europe - Destroyed in Reading

There were over 12,000 flying accidents in the USA during the War – including this one when a B-24 was being ferried to storage at Reading Airport.

http://readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=414299

 

Three Stories: Driving Trucks, Driving Wire, and Digging up Mines

A person who was in the South Pacific; the  44th Division, and the 28th Division.

http://www.mariettatimes.com/page/content.detail/id/546531/World-War-II-.html?nav=5002

With the 81st “Wildcat” Division in the Pacific

Cpl. Charles Sidener was with an anti-tank unit, and the Japanese did not field many tanks on the islands, and spent most of his time doing direct support fire support into pillboxes, hills and other front line combat needs. A WW II Army movie, “Action At Angaur”, documents the battle of the 81st Division in the Peleliu Campaign. (Oregon’s EAA Chapter  105 has an original 16mm version of the movie  which I have digitized.)

http://www.limaohio.com/news/local_news/article_5f0fd49e-f559-11e1-bfa1-0019bb30f31a.html

 

New Book about a Murder during WWI

Set in a hospital during 1918 of World War I, “An Unmarked Grave” ,   has Nurse Bess Crawford investigating a murder while in the front lines of World War I. Written by  Charles Todd, & William Morrow,  262 pages, $24.99.

 

  http://journalstar.com/entertainment/arts-and-culture/books/book-review-murder-mystery-is-set-against-bloody-wwi-in/article_933297df-7e29-5365-b02f-3a82dee0613f.html

 

Book: Battleground Prussia

When the summer of 1944 ended Soviet Armies were at the German Border – and for the next 9 months the Eastern Front saw some of the heaviest fighting of the war – on par with Stalingrad and Karkov , but this time within Germany itself.

http://www.monstersandcritics.com/books/reviews/article_1703720.php/Battleground-Prussia-The-Assault-on-Germany-s-Eastern-Front-1944-45-%E2%80%93-Book-Review

The PBJ-1 of Esspriuto-Santo (now called Vanuatu)

In 1944 the bomber was reported lost at sea – but actually crashed into a mountain on Esprito Santo and was discovered via by a SN being seen on a PBJ-1 being restored. By Ned Wernick, who flew 20 missions in PBJ-1s in the South Pacific in the 423 Bomb Squadron – and the SN was from a plane reported lost. (This is a follow-up of a previous reported Milk Run article).

http://www.thetowntalk.com/article/20120916/NEWS/120916007?nclick_check=1

 70 Years ago the Yanks Arrived in Australia

John Wells, 18th Recon Squadron / 408th Bomb Squadron and part of the 22 Bomb Group goes to Australia as the representative of that unit of  their arrival in Australia during WW II. He has a brand new replica uniform of what he wore back then for the event. He flew B-26 Martin Marauders.

An illustrated World War II history of the 22nd Bombardment Group "Revenge of the Red Raiders" is available in the Pasadena Public Library system.

http://www.presstelegram.com/breakingnews/ci_21559047/93-year-old-wwii-pilot-flies-back-australia

Lunch with Spitfire Pilots

August 1940 thru August 1942 was a tough time to be a Spitfire Pilot – but this August it was a lot easier for these WW II pilots who gathered at Goodwood for lunch. The ceremony coincided with the launch of a new book, To War in a Spitfire, about Lt Col Strawn.

http://www.chichester.co.uk/news/spitfire-heroes-get-together-for-launch-1-4201710

Spitfire Special Air Delivery

This could be one reason why Spitfire pilots always loved their airplane. A Spit IX carrying beer kegs to the pilots in Normandy.

 

You had to fly at 15,000 for at least 15 minutes to cool the beer – and you better make a smooth landing.

 

In his book "Dancing in the Skies", Tony Jonsson, the only Icelander pilot in the RAF, recalled beer runs while he was flying with 65 Squadron. Every week a pilot was sent back to the UK to fill some cleaned-up drop tanks with beer and return to the squadron. Jonsson hated the beer runs as every man on the squadron would be watching you upon arrival. Anyone who made a rough landing and dropped the tanks would be the most hated man on the squadron for an entire week. 

 

The Malta Invasion of 1942 – That never Occurred

The defense of Malta from 1940 onwards affected the outcome of the North Africa Campaign. Germany and Italy had prepared plans to invade – but the invasion never occurred to due a variety of operational and personality quirks of the Fascist leaders.

http://www.timesofmalta.com/articles/view/20120819/life-features/Axis-plan-for-invasion-of-Malta.433565

The Tunnels of Ramsgate

Almost forgotten, the tunnels were used as shelters – and by a few hundred people living quarters – during 1940/1941 during the Luftwaffe attacks.

http://www.thisiskent.co.uk/Tunnels-saved-lives-bombs-rained/story-16760668-detail/story.html

 

The “Oregon Boys” 2nd Volunteer infantry in the Philippines

I found this stereo view in an antique shop in Aurora a few weeks ago.

 

Pvt. Marcus William Robertson won the Congressional Medal of Honor while serving in the Philippines in 1899.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marcus_William_Robertson#cite_note-AMOHW-1

 

Flying with the 371st Fighter Squadron

Terrance Popravak Jr has set up a Wordpress blog to talk about the history of the 371st Fighter Group – which was renumbered in 1946 and became the 142 Fighter Wing which is based at Portland, Oregon.

 

http://371stfightergroup.wordpress.com

 Oregon Chapter News, Archive Loan / Donation, and Contact Information

Oregon Chapter 2012 Meeting dates: February 11; May 12; August 11; November 3

Next Oregon Chapter Meeting November 3, 2012

The August Speaker

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Xlpwfj3mL._SL110_.jpgP-51 Ace Clayton Kelly Groce was the speaker at the August meeting. Clayton started flying out of Portland Air Base flying in 1942 in Bell P-39 Aircobras and was the first pilot to land at Aurora airport. He wrote an autobiography of his adventures in WW II called “Live Bait”.

Amazon link:  Live Bait

 

Using a WW II Theme for Modern Uses

This website uses WW II video and phrases to show what they can do in creating websites for businesses and organizations. Hover over the top menu for a pretty cool cursor.

 

Some people do appreciate history.

 

http://www.targetscope.com/

 

A Victoria Cross for John Simpson Kirkpatrick (aka John Simpson)?

 

A petition has been started to grant a VC to this ANZAC stretcher bearer who, during a 25 day period in the Gallipoli campaign before being killed, rescued some 300 soldiers from the front line. He originally was from South Shields in England.

 

http://www.heraldsun.com.au/news/world/british-push-for-victoria-cross-for-gallipoli-hero-john-simpson-kirkpatrick/story-fnd134gw-1226481466368

 

Annual POW Ceremony at Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital

Four former POWs at the hospital recounted their experiences at this annual event.

 

http://www.columbiatribune.com/news/2012/sep/22/prisoners-of-war-share-stories-during-annual/

 

Germany Artillery Discovered in the Mountains of Russia

Moved to the tops of a mountain in 1942, before the Soviet Stalingrad counteroffensive, they had to be abandoned when the Wehrmacht forces withdrew to avoid being captured in the winter of 1942/1943.

 

They were at the Donguz-Orun pass at an elevation of 9,184 feet.

 

http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/german-world-war-ii-artillery-found-in-russian-mountains-268088

 

Oldest WW II era Soviet Marshall Dead at 101

Marshal Sergey Sokolov, who fought at Lake Hasan during WW II, died in Moscow at 101.

 

http://vestnikkavkaza.net/news/society/30852.html

 

Book Reviews: “When Hitler Took Austria” and “Road to Valor”

One is the story of Kurt Von Schuschnigg, the son of the Austrian chancellor when it was incorporated into the Reich in 1938, and the Italian cyclist Gino Bartali.

 

http://www.catholicsentinel.org/Main.asp?SectionID=6&SubSectionID=31&ArticleID=19334

An interview with British historian Antony Beevor

Antony Beevor is the author of the book “Stalingrad”.

 

“Beevor: The point about the Battle of Stalingrad was that it was the psychological turning point of the war. It became quite clear both to the Red Army and also to the German Army that from now on there would now be a movement toward the West and eventually Berlin would suffer the same fate as Stalingrad.

 

I think that it’s highly significant that even today on the Reichstag you can see the graffiti of Russian soldiers with the words "Stalingrad-Berlin." The two cities were very much linked in their mind.”

 

http://www.turkishweekly.net/news/141072/a-victory-of-courage-and-coercion-british-historian-on-stalingrad-39-s-legacy.html

“The Big Red One”

Samuel Fuller made the movie made in 1980 was actually in the 1st Infantry Division throughout the war. This article gives some background information on why he made it. Be sure to watch/get the full 162 minute version.

 

http://www.thejewishweek.com/arts/film/grunts-eye-view-modern-combat

 

New “Wake Island” flag raised over Boise

At the start of WW II in the Pacific Wake Island held out against the Japanese for 15 days before being taken – they even sunk two destroyers and other smaller ships.

 

250 Idahoans were on the island when it was attacked – and 98 civilians were later executed by the Japanese.

(Originally the Japanese Admiral in charge was going to execute everyone on Wake Island after it was captured but a Japanese Army General talked him out of it.)

 

http://www.ktvb.com/news/local/New-Wake-Island-flag-dedicated--169921626.html

 

Korean Government purchases – again – building that was the Korean Embassy in 1891

Sold off by Japan in 1910 after Korea was annexed into the Japanese Empire, the building was recently purchased by the Korean Government to once again may become an official residence.

 

http://www.wrex.com/story/19542236/skorea-regains-old-embassy-in-us-snipes-at-japan

 

China Officially Launches their first Aircraft Carrier

Rebuild from a hull purchased from the Ukraine, it is mainly a training carrier before the Chinese custom built carrier is launched in a few years.

 

http://www.voanews.com/content/china-commissions-first-aircraft-carrier/1514342.html

 

Gallup out of the History Books for the War of 1812

If you can ride, and want to participate in a 1812 style calvary charge – get to Maidstone Conservation Area at 1213 Sideroad in the town of Lakeshore in Ontario and become part of the US Forces sacking towns and villages in Ontario – and be filmed for it.

http://1812.visualheritage.ca

 

http://www.windsorstar.com/entertainment/Casting+call+mounted+extras+1812+documentary/7283614/story.html

 

The Naval War in 1812-1814

The US Army, asides from a few minor battles, pretty much lost every engagement. The Navy, on the other hand, won outright or came to a draw – which against the British was a victory – during the war.

 

Malta Re-Enactment Groups

Re-enactors exist around the world – one group in Malta has the main focus of the Medieval period in Central Europe, from the arrival of Count Roger to the end of the Feudal Era on the island. They also have WW II era re-enactors.

http://www.di-ve.com/news/reproducing-200-year-old-uniforms

 

Sgt James Firth, VC, needs a new Headstone

During the Boer War he won the VC rescuing wounded men, even though he himself was wounded through the nose and eye. His headstone, due to weathering effects on the marble, has lost lots of the wording on the stone.

http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/3-000-appeal-to-restore-war-hero-s-grave-1-4951465

 

Don Smith of the Doolittle Raiders inducted into the S.D. Aviation Hall of Fame

Pilot of B-25 #15 he crashed into the South China Sea, evaded the Japanese, and was back home in the states by July 4, 1942.

He then went to the ETO and died in a plane accident outside of London in November of 1942.

 

http://rapidcityjournal.com/news/local/communities/belle_fourche/belle-fourche-s-wwii-doolittle-raid-pilot-to-be-honored/article_20efbd80-8ad4-52b9-b4c6-0261da7fc8df.html

 

Korean War Vet gets his Bronze Star

Puerto Rico based 65th Infantry Regiment fought during the Korean war – and Luis Ramos, along with a few others from his regiment, were able to attend when he Col. David J Clark pinned the medal onto him on September 7, 2012 in Florida where he now lives.

http://www.boston.com/news/world/caribbean/2012/09/07/korean-war-vet-gets-belated-honors-puerto-rico/wxWv9mYR7rTn6G0hF7ofsL/story.html

 

Lt. Col Woodrow W Crockett, Tuskegee Airman, dead at 93

He died August 16 at Knollwood retirement community in Washington State. They were based out of Ramitelli Italy during the war. He lead the group by the end of the war.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/decorated-tuskegee-airman-and-retired-air-force-lt-col-woodrow-w-crockett-dies/2012/09/09/01ac7574-fa94-11e1-875c-4c21cd68f653_story.html

 

A B-25 Accident during the War

Over 7,100 US aircraft were destroyed during WW II in training, transportation or other causes. This B-25 crashed during bad weather – into a town.

 

http://www.newarkadvocate.com/article/20120909/NEWS01/209090303?nclick_check=1

 

Woman Marine Gets Hospital Visit by Two Generals

90 Year old Corporal Nell Martin Campbell, who served in WW II, was in the hospital with 7 broken ribs and punctured lung after falling down was visited by her grandson - Lt. Col. James R. Martin, but other Generals also came to visit her. Over 18,000 women joined the Marines during WWII (WW II did not OFICIALLY end till December 31, 1946 for computing service era awards).

 

During the WWII era, Army women soldiers had a nickname of “WACS”, the Navy had “WAVES,” which are both acronyms for women in the Army and Navy respectively.

 

But, when asked what women Marines would be nicknamed, Gen. Thomas Holcomb said in the March 27, 1944, issue of Life magazine: “They are Marines. They don’t have a nickname and they don’t need one. They got their basic training in a Marine atmosphere at a Marine post. They inherit the traditions of Marines. They are Marines.”

 

http://richmondregister.com/localnews/x2056639545/WWII-era-female-Marine-honored-by-top-brass-military

 

Silver Star Awarded to Senior Airman Bradley R. Smith

Killed in action on January 3, 2010, the award was formally presented to his widow in September.

 

The Silver Star is one level below the Congressional Medal of Honor.

 

http://www.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123317250

 

Me-323 Wreck Found off Sardinia

Damaged by a British Beaufighter, it was able to dock before it sunk but only a few of the people on board were able to get out. Around 200 Me-323 “Giants” were produced during the war – and none survived.

http://news.discovery.com/history/german-plane-wreck-found-120914.html

 

German Dig at a Lancaster Crash Site of aircraft ED 427

The Lancaster bomber crashed in April of 1943 – blowing up as it the ground. They started the dig and quickly found bone fragments.

 

The British military will bury the remains found during the excavation together, and that they’ll mark the grave with the names of all seven airmen who were aboard: Alexander Bone, Norman Foster, Cyril Yelland, Raymond White, Raymond Rooney, Ronald Cope and Bruce Watt, who was a Canadian.

 

http://www.stripes.com/news/dig-unearths-british-wwii-bomber-crash-remains-1.189451

 

A Foot locker Returned – 10 years after being left behind in a Move

WW II fighter pilot Bruce Latter had all his WW II fighter items in his foot locker, including helmet, gun camera film and other flying gear, but when he moved the locker in the attic was forgotten about – and it shows up on his door 10 years later.

 

http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/sep/15/wwii-trunk-delivered-to-vero-beach-veteran-pilot/

 

Flying and Fighting in Two Wars

 

Brig. Gen. Victor Herbert Strahm flew in WW I and during WW II he also participated as part of the 9th Air Force – when “Tidal Wave” - the Ploesti raid – occurred. He was interviewed during the Army Hour radio program.

 

http://www.bgdailynews.com/bicentennial/remarkable-courage/article_b1598e28-fddf-11e1-8971-001a4bcf887a.html

 

Oregon Chapter News

Membership Status

Currently the chapter continues to send to people meeting notifications and information to people who have NOT paid their dues for two years before they are officially dropped from the roster. The yearly dues statements (except for those life members) will be coming out after the November meeting. Please check with Sharon Campbell if you are unsure of your membership status at 503-632-7633.

 When a member dies the chapter continues to send notifications for a year after being notified of their death.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

  

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 


“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News Update for August 2012

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

Flying in the Mediterranean Theatre in P-38s

Robert “Smoky” A. Vrilakas, who lives in Happy Valley Oregon, published a book in February of 2012 called "Look Mom-- I Can Fly! Memoirs of a World War II P-38 Fighter Pilot ", about his time flying combat during 1943 and 1944 in the MTO.

 

Published by Amethyst Moon Publishing Company http://www.ampubbooks.com/

 Amazon Book link: Look Mom - I Can Fly! Memoirs of a World War II P-38 Fighter Pilot

Amazon Kindle link: Look, Mom-I Can Fly! Memoirs of a World War II P-38 Fighter Pilot

There are a lot fewer books about combat flying in the Africa /Med / Italy even though the number of personnel who flew in combat are about the same in number compared to those that flew out of England.

 Nuthampstead Airfield Museum

The home field for the 398th Bombardment Group (Heavy) during World War II, the airfield is building a new museum complex to house artifacts. You can find out more by going to their web site at http://www.398th.org and / or visit in person at:

Nuthampstead Airfield Museum; c/o Bee Farm; Nuthampstead; Royston; Hertfordshire, SG8 8NB, U.K.

PS: You will be happy to know that the Woodman Inn pub is close by the museum. http://www.thewoodman-in.co.uk

 

“White 3” Goes 2,500 Miles

From pilot Wolf Czaia who flew the brand new Me-262 from Washington’s Paine Field, to Virginia.

‘After the successful completion of the flight test program and some bureaucratic and weather delays, I ferried the airplane from Paine Field, Washington to Suffolk County Airport in Virginia. For the last two test flights we had converted it to the two-seat configuration, which allowed our lead mechanic Mike Anderson to come along as crew chief/navigator on this 2,500 mile trip. As our FAA- operating limitations mandated 'Day VFR only', and the max altitude of 18 000 ft, not exactly optimal for range, it took us four days and six refueling stops across the continent to reach our destination, with "WHITE 3" performing flawlessly. ATC doesn't have a computer code yet for the Me262, and controllers frequently asked me for the type of airplane.  They usually couldn't wait then to pass the information on to 'their' airliners on the same frequency, e.g. "Delta 123, you have a MESSERSCHMITT!! in your ten o'clock, five miles". One of the many funny replies: "Are we being invaded?"...

After receiving its new airworthiness certificate and operating limitations (the initial ones were valid only for flight test and repositioning), I'll be flying "WHITE 3" from its maintenance base in Suffolk County to its final destination, a small airport south of Virginia Beach with a 5000ft grass runway, where it will join - as the first jet - the world's largest collection of privately owned warbirds in the "Military Aviation Museum." ‘

http://www.militaryaviationmuseum.org/

Winning Gold in the Olympics – Dying in World War II

There were American, German, Hungarian and Japanese Gold Medal Winners who won medals between the wars and who were killed as a result of World War II. This includes General George S. Patton Jr. and Col Takeichi Nishi – who died on Iwo Jima.

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/olympic-gold-medalists-lost-lives-world-war-ii-063500130--oly.html

New Exhibit Hall for Veterans

Pierre Claeyssen’s Veterans’ Museum and Library built a  new exhibit hall which is dedicated to local veterans of every American conflict since World War I. Sgt. Major Robert Forties, a Veteran of the Normandy Invasion in WWII with the 82nd Airborne and recipient of the Silver Star, Bronze Star and five (5!) Purple Hearts, was there to present plaques.

http://thedailysound.com/2012/07/new-santa-barbara-exhibit-hall-honors-u-s-veterans/

First Victoria Cross Awarded to a Private of WW I Auctioned off

He got word that he was awarded it by the Germans – since he been captured in 1914 – but he eventually escaped the POW camp in 1918. It was sold for 276,000 pounds.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/18899503

New book on the American Volunteers in World War I – before war was declared by the USA

 

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51TcJBxGJRL._SL110_.jpgWhen the “Great War” started in 1914 Americans began to volunteer for the Allies often going to Britain and France on their own and most ended up in the Ambulance Corps if they went to France, some in the Lafayette Escadrille and while few did get into the front lines most others went into support roles. A new book by Ed and Libby Klekowski  “Eyewitnesses to the Great War" published by McFarland & Company of North Carolina and London, tells their stories by using their firsthand accounts of some of the people who went “Over There” before the US formally went “Over There”.

http://www.gazettenet.com/2012/07/13/unvarnished-versions?SESS4ece4b466ce9a29264652cacd3b881df=gnews

 Amazon link: Eyewitnesses to the Great War

Rob Morris’s Book Published

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51jcZtFmtUL._SL110_.jpg

A new book about the 95 Bombardment Group (Heavy) that flew out of Horham during WW II is officially out on August 1, 2012. It's about the 95th, but the 100th flew with the 95th most of the time, and there are many 100 vets who were interviewed for the book. No less than Michael Faley has endorsed the book.  The 95th has a really nice site at Horham – they have restored the “Red Feather Club” and it hosts reunions and is open for rent on (what’s left) of the airbase.

 

95th BG Horham UK web site: http://www.95thbg-horham.com/

95th BG Web site: http://95thbg.org/95th_joomla/

 

Amazon link: The Wild Blue Yonder and Beyond: The 95th Bomb Group in War and Peace

A Medic in the Australian Army

Declared unfit for combat Ian Jacobs when he tried to enlist he instead enlisted into the Commonwealth Medical Services and served till 1944 till leaving the service as a Major in North Africa, India and Palestine – including the siege of Tobruk.

http://www.theage.com.au/national/obituaries/compassionate-man-made-his-mark-20120719-22dam.html

During many Pacific Battles he collected Souvenirs -  Birds, Shells and Plants

Trained as a pharmacist and assigned to the 11th Marines (1st Marine Division), Sammy Ray took part in battles at Peleliu, Okinawa among others. But while not being shot at he would go around collecting plants and birds and send them back to the Smithsonian Institution.

http://www.stripes.com/news/marine-corps/smithsonian-to-display-former-marine-s-birds-of-war-1.183393

New book out on Georgy Zhukov

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51NsfglAyYL._SL110_.jpgIn the Soviet Union under Joseph Stalin being good at something always meant you had to walk a fine line between good enough to do your job so as not to get shot, while also not being seen as too good and thus famous and popular to live and become a threat to Stalin’s popularity and be killed. Zhukov survived and did both but at the same time was written out of the official Communist history books after the war in order that Stalin be seen as the one person who saved the U.S.S.R. from NAZI Germany. General Zhukov was there at Moscow, Stalingrad, Kursk, Berlin and led the victory parade in Moscow – before being exiled to a demeaning command and forced into retirement – but he lived and died a natural death.

 

STALIN‘S GENERAL: THE LIFE OF GEORGY ZHUKOV by Geoffrey Roberts, Random House, 334 pages.

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2012/jul/2/russian-general-best-in-world-war-ii/

Amazon link: Stalin's General

 

Azerbaijan to pay stipends to WW II Veterans

By official decreed those who served during the war will now get a monthly income as a “thank-you” of their service between 1941 and 1945.

http://abc.az/eng/news/main/66170.html

 

A Successful POW Escape – Not easy if you are Indian

Ram Swarup was captured in Italy in 1943 and sent to a German POW camp – where he eventually escaped from and made a “home run” back to Allied lines. This was not easy to do being from Rupnagar district of India since you definitely cannot blend in easily with other Europeans. One other Indian, Tikka Khan, who was captured with 2 Field Regiment at Bir Hakeim (Libya) in 1942, also successfully escaped.

Other famous units from India which fought in WW II include the Long Range Squadron, which was incorporated into the Long Range Desert Group, and the Punjab Regiment.

http://www.hindustantimes.com/Punjab/Chandigarh/He-escaped-from-Axis-custody-in-WW2/SP-Article1-890068.aspx

Medals of Captain Mike Stephens Auctioned Off

The nine medals that the 22 plane ace was awarded during World War II were sold for 93,000 pounds. Like the RAF pilot during the Battle of Britain, he almost bailed out his burning plane, but went back into his Hurricane fighter to shoot down a German Bf-109 fighter over Libya who had shot up his plane and got it on fire flew ahead , so he climbed back in and shot it down, then bailed out.

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2167681/Medals-belonging-Second-World-War-flying-ace-heroically-battled-Luftwaffe-ON-FIRE-sell-100-000.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

10th Mountain Division back in Italy

A few veterans of this division made a visit back to Italy on a reunion tour of the battlefields that the division fought on. “At its conception, the division was only a battalion and unique to the U.S. Army. Known as the 87th Mountain Infantry Battalion, it was activated at Fort Lewis, Wash., in December 1941, with many of its first Soldiers being handpicked or recruited for their abilities in mountaineering and skiing. “

The division trained on Mount Hood in Oregon for some to learn and for others to gain practice in skiing.

"A Soldier's Story," written by division veteran and former Senator Bob Dole was given to Charlie Smith and Senator Dole mentions him in the book and the locations where he fought.

“ ‘This is the first time I've known exactly where I was at during the war.’ Smith said with a smile."

http://www.army.mil/article/83448/10th_Mountain_Division_veterans_return_to_Italy/

Germany Agrees to pay claims to Jewish people still living in former Soviet Union Areas

Established in 1952, the Hardship fund pays claims (primarily) to Jewish people who were victimized as a result of NAZI policies during World War II who were living in the Soviet Union when war commenced.

Claim filings begin on November 1, 2012.

http://www.jwire.com.au/news/germany-accepting-soviet-wwii-claims/26332

Bombardier and Pilot of the “Able Mable” meet up one last time

The last two crewmembers still alive of the B-17 named “Able Mable”, which flew 30 missions over Germany, meet up as John Fisher, 95 lies at home. They flew in the 334th Bomber Squadron of the 95th Bomb Group in the 8th Air Force.

http://www.mansfieldnewsjournal.com/article/20120701/NEWS01/207010324/Stuff-Local-Mansfield-war-hero-made-world-better-place

 

Silver Bars Recovered from WW II Torpedoed Ship

Odyssey Marine Exploration Inc. has recovered 1,203 silver bars from the SS Gairsoppa, a 412-foot British cargo ship that sank after being torpedoed by a German U-boat in February 1941.

In prior war when buying weapons, or any goods, purchases had to be paid for in hard currency - silver or gold and then physically shipped around the world. Multiple ships carrying gold and silver were sunk during the war and now various firms are finding the wrecks and recovering the medals.

http://www.irishcentral.com/news/WWII-shipwreck-off-Ireland-yields-38-million-of-silver-for-deep-sea-firm-163156236.html#ixzz21CJINXWw

Book: World War II Remembered

 

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51rlo1qvR6L._SL110_.jpgPublished by the University Press of New England it consists of 56 Essays about World War II by those who participated in the war - who now live in a retirement community.

 

Amazon link: World War II Remembered

 

http://articles.boston.com/2012-07-22/books/32772258_1_retirement-community-author-events-brookline-booksmith

 

What Makes an Ace an Ace?

Since the beginning of aerial combat only 816 fighter pilots have become Aces while flying for the USA. Only 39 achieved that status during the Korean War and 3 during the Vietnam War - none since. The "10 sortie rule" then comes into play. If was often stated that if a fighter pilot survived their first 10 sorties they often survived the war. (At least for those Western Allied pilots who had a tour limit. German, Italian, Japanese, & Russian pilots flew until killed, wounded out of combat, or captured.)

http://www.strategypage.com/htmw/htmurph/articles/20120724.aspx

Japanese Command Bunker Complex Still There

At the Sasebo Naval District on Kyushu the Japanese Military built an underground command complex which still exists today. The main role was to coordinate the air defenses of southern Japan.

 

http://www.stripes.com/military-life/japan-take-a-rare-look-into-abandoned-wwii-site-1.182140

Benito Mussolini’s Air Raid Bunkers under his House

Like all military and political planners after the “Great War” people feared bombs raining down causing destruction on a vast scale from enemy bombers – and so built shelters for both the common people – and the top leaders. You can tour the shelters that Italian leader Benito Mussolini had built under his house – now a museum.

The only nations that actually experienced deliberate bombings designed to destroy whole cities, which all the theorists expected to be the normal use of bombers, was Germany and Japan.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-18828612

Hunting Skills and a Short Stature – You’re A Ball Turret Gunner

James L. Moore joined the military in 1944 with plans of becoming a pilot – but with so many pilots already in training and the expectation from the War Department was that the war would be over before anyone starting pilot training in mid-1944 could graduate after a year and a half of training, so they changed his assignment into that of a B-17 Ball Turret gunner. He flew his first mission in January of 1945 and was shot down on his sixth – but he and the rest of the crew were able to bail out over Russian occupied Poland and avoid being captured by the Germans.

http://www.uniondemocrat.com/News/Local-News/Phoenix-Lake-man-saw-plenty-of-aerial-action

Air Force Two – Is now an Fire Fighter Tanker Aircraft

This proves being #2 is often being forgotten. A Convair C131-H that for one brief mission was not just a cargo plane used by President Nixon support staff hauling cargo behind the 747 which was normally “Air Force One”, it became “Air Force One” for a day when he had to visit West Virginia and the only plane that could land there was the C-131. It now flies out of Canada.

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/news/Nixon+Force+fights+fires/6898472/story.html

The Memphis Belle – at MacDill AFB in Florida

After the War Bond Tour of the “Memphis Belle” in 1943, the plane was stationed at MacDill as a training plane for crews – the Army Air Force was not going to let a flyable aircraft stay on the tarmac.

http://www.tampabay.com/news/military/macdill/macdill-air-force-base-once-home-to-famed-memphis-belle/1238783

Getting into the Pilot’s Seat of a B-24 again at 89

The Collings Foundation tour allowed Chris Christensen into the pilot’s seat of their B-24 at the stop at Silverhawk Aviation in Nebraska. Christensen was 22 at the time he started flying missions out of Italy in 1944 as part of the 15th Air Force.

 

http://journalstar.com/news/local/retired-lincoln-pilot-climbs-back-in-world-war-ii-seat/article_603eb74a-215e-5afa-bc21-8fe039783788.html

B-24 “Hot Stuff” finished 25 missions before the “Memphis Belle”– but Crashed in Iceland on the way to the States

It is stated that “history is written by the victors” but in this case the first 25 mission victory award  was assigned to the B-17 “Memphis Belle” due to the crash of the B-24 “Hot Stuff” going home on a War Bond Tour. The pilot and 4 other crew members of the B-24 were supposed to be on the flight – but was bumped off the plane due to General Andrews wanting to get back to DC to get his 4th Star. “Hot Stuff” was a plane in “Ted’s Traveling Circus”, the 93 Bombardment Group (Heavy).  A certificate signed by Col. Edward "Ted" Timberlake, shows mission No. 25 over Naples, Italy, dated "7 Feb. 43.".

 

http://www.toledoblade.com/Nation/2012/07/04/Researcher-disputes-claim-of-record-for-Memphis-Belle.html

Wheels Up – Plane Down – and now the Medals for it

Russell Erikson had to land his B-24 gear up at Shipham England after a mission to Hamburg due to battle damage – the ground crew counted over 200 holes in the aircraft after he landed it. The paperwork for his WW II medals finally caught up with him and at 89 he was awarded Air Medal with a Silver Oak Leaf Cluster, the American Campaign Medal, the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal with Three Bronze Service Stars and the World War II Victory Medal.

http://www.patriotledger.com/topstories/x1222860324/Quincy-resident-Russell-Erikson-honored-for-his-service-in-WWII#ixzz21CWkn6Bg

Agent “Garbo” – Master Spy for both the British and the Germans

Juan Pujol Garcia was an unlikely hero of World War II -  by sending valid and imaginary military data to the Germans over a long period of time it got them to be so trusting of his information so that when he finally told a flat out lie – they believed him during the Normandy Invasion.

http://www.wbur.org/npr/156189716/agent-garbo-the-spy-who-lied-about-d-day

Purposely Not Being Taught History is not just a USA Trend

It seems that a new survey in England has found out that just under 43% of all 17 and 18 years in school that were surveyed (1000 people) knew that it was fought in the air – and only around 2% knew it occurred in 1940.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2164115/The-Battle-Britain-Wasnt-sea-Half-secondary-school-pupils-know-battle-took-place-air.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

 

A Movie about the Inventor of the ZERO Dr. Hirokoshi – In Anime

A possible movie by Studio Ghibli based on the man who designed the Japanese WW II Zero Dr. Hirokoshi, may be in the works by animator Hayao Miyazaki.

The Japanese A6M2 “Zero” fighter started off the war with a 12:1 kill ratio against the Allies.

http://kotaku.com/5928160/studio-ghiblis-next-film-is-about-japans-most-famous-fighter-plane-and-the-guy-who-designed-it/

“HomeTown Heros” – Audio recordings of WW II Veterans

On radio station KMJ (no idea where the radio station is at, web site does not show city/state at all) they have recorded interviews of various veterans and published them on their web site.

Wilbur Gomes, 98th BG (H) and others are interviewed.

http://www.kmjnow.com/pages/landing?Rescued-Prisoner-of-War-Shares-Story=1&blockID=622121&feedID=806

Visiting Tibenham’s B-24 Base

Scott Culver is the son of a B-24 Ball turret gunner who flew the Consolidated B-24 Liberator while Col. Jimmy Stewart was the Commanding Officer of the unit. He went over to England to visit the base his father flew out of during 1943/1944 when he was assigned to the 703rd Bombardment Squadron.  They had an air festival there on July 8th.

http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/american_son_of_second_world_war_airman_returns_to_tibenham_airfield_1_1432312

The B-17G Pilots of the plane “Pretty Baby's Boys” get a DFC after 67 Years

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51GoFVDqoVL._SL110_.jpgPiloting the heavily damaged B-17 back from the mission on 20 March 1945 to Vienna they made it over the Alps but had to ditch the a/c in the Adriatic. The navigator, Harvey S. Horn, was able to get all the required paperwork together and submit it to the Air Force so that the two pilots could get the award. They were based out of Foggia, Italy as part of the 772nd Bomber Squadron, 463th Bomber Group, 15th Air Force. Harvey wrote a book called “Goldfish-Silver Boot, The Story of a World War II Prisoner of War" about the crew’s POW experience.

 

http://thephoto-news.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120706/NEWS01/120709980/One-veteran%27s-quest--

 

Amazon link: Goldfish - Silver Boot | The Story of a World War II Prisoner Of War

A Veteran of the Flying Tigers – but not a Pilot

The Pilots of the AVG – American Volunteer Group – got all the press of their combat exploits in China but the ground crews and other support personnel were also part of the AVG – yet some are still not granted veteran status. John Yee is one such person – he was an official translator for the AVG. He became a US Citizen in 1952 but because he is missing a piece of paper, unlikely ever to be found, the US Government has repeatedly denied his status as a Veteran of the AVG and be entitled to military benefits.

Ding Hao!

 The term roughly means, "you're the best" in Chinese.

Often repeated in WW II movies, and the nose art on P-51B North American made Mustang Serial number 43-6315 as flown by Maj. James Howard of the 356th Fighter Squadron, 354th Fighter Group, 9th AF. He flew in China with the AVG before going into the 9th AF.  The term was spread throughout India by the AVG initially. CBI WWII pilots used 'Ding Hao' as a term of salutation.

 

The expression "Ding Hao" is also been shown to be a Chinese military expression similar to the Seals' “HOOYA!”, or the Marines' “OOHRA!” showing pride and Espirit de Corps.

 

Steven Hunter used it in Chapter 17, page 167, of his latest book "I Sniper".

 

http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_21097497/world-war-ii-translator-honored-service-flying-tigers

A “Kamikaze” Doll gets donated to Pensacola Naval Aviation Museum

Created by Japanese citizens and given to the pilots before a mission, this one survived even though the pilot died when he crashed his plane onto a ship, one of the ship’s crew picked it off of the dead pilot.

http://www.theolathenews.com/2012/07/20/1594196/piece-of-wwii-kamikaze-history.html

July 19, 1870 – Franco-Prussian War is started

It set the stage for both World War I and World War II.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2012/jul/20/archive-1870-franco-prussian-war?newsfeed=true

 

Finding a St Petersburg Newspaper Clipping -- on dead Japanese Soldier

After a firefight on Bougainville a US Marine was going through the pockets of the dead Japanese soldiers and found a clipping of a woman competing in a St Petersburg beauty pageant – his home town.

 

http://www.tampabay.com/news/obituaries/mystery-of-a-war-souvenir-remains-unsolved-after-st-petersburg-womans-death/1241350

 

Fighting the War by Radar

William Davies was drafted right after starting to work at IBM in record keeping – but ended up as a 2nd Lt working with RADAR equipment.

 

http://lubbockonline.com/life-columnists/2012-07-22/bill-davies-fought-world-war-ii-radar

 

WW II Bombardier Lt Col Donald Sebastian – 306th BG

Stationed at Thurleigh in the 369 Bomb Squadron of the 306th Bombardment Group (Heavy) during WW II he died at the age of 88 on July 20th.

http://host.madison.com/news/local/obituaries/article_51c4b406-d35f-11e1-8c5b-0019bb2963f4.html

 

World War I Fighter Plane now on Display

A recreated Morane Saulnier G WWI Russian fighter plane is now on display at the Omaka Aviation Heritage Centre.

http://www.stuff.co.nz/marlborough-express/news/7272454/Russian-fighter-plane-recreated

150 Years of History – The Royal Westminster Regiment

A new pictorial book about the 150 years that this unit has existed will be published by the Vialogue Publishing Canada Ltd.;  http://www.vivalogue.ca   The unit is stationed in British Columbia, Canada. The book is expected to be published by November, 2012.

http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/6/prweb9648069.htm

Rise of the Railway Gun

In the US Civil war guns were placed on railway cars and were used but the guns were relatively small since the recoil limited their ability to be used when fired directly to the side of the cars. Other nations also tested out the idea including from reading about their use in the USA, including this trial in England in 1894.

http://www.sussexexpress.co.uk/community/nostalgia/the-day-the-train-gun-was-tested-at-tide-mills-1-4001355

Theodore Roosevelt’s Rough Riders Rifles – Not made in the USA

The only reason Roosevelt got to Cuba was that he got the unit Norwegian Rifles – the 30-40 Krag rifle. Roosevelt himself took along a Winchester Model 95.

http://www.theodoreroosevelt.org/life/Rough_Riders%20rifle.htm

A Reporter in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War

Being an embedded journalist is nothing new – this was common during the 1898 Spanish American War and conflicts thereafter. Francis D. Millet when to the Philippines during the war and was there June to September 1898. He wrote a book in 1899 called “The Expedition to the Philippines.” It is digitized within the Library of Congress.

July 4 in the Philippines is known as Filipino-American Friendship day.

Millet and his friend, Maj. Archibald Butt, a military aide to President Howard Taft, when down with the RMS Titanic in April of 1912.

http://globalnation.inquirer.net/42807/us-journalist-in-the-spanish-american-war-cites-filipinos%E2%80%99-strong-sense-of-justice

A Colt 38 Saved from Destruction

In New York all confiscated guns are destroyed unless they have an “historical” value. An Assistant District attorney, who happens to be allowed to own firearms, saw the Colt New Army and Navy Revolver, in .38 caliber, on a table of weapons slated for destruction and was allowed to fill out the paperwork to get it, then he donated it to the NYS Military Museum. It was originally presented to Capt. William L. Flanagan, in 1898 by members of the 2nd Battery New York and was engraved with that info.

http://saratogian.com/articles/2012/07/14/news/doc5001d462bbc7e336920563.txt

New British Army will have less troops than Wellington had at Waterloo

The British Government will be cutting troop levels down to a level below the number of troops that Duke of Wellington had at Waterloo.

http://blog.foreignpolicy.com/posts/2012/07/05/british_defense_secretary_announces_major_force_cuts

 

A French Eagle at Essex Regiment Museum

Captured at the Battle of Salamanca from the French 62nd Regiment, this item is on display at the museum since its capture July 22, 1812.

http://www.thisistotalessex.co.uk/Royal-Anglians-proud-glorious-history/story-16553556-detail/story.html

Re-Creating the Ride from the Battle of Borodino

Don Cossacks will ride across Europe again in the re-creation of the route they took 200 years ago after their forefathers fought against Napoleon at the Battle of Borodino – around 70 miles west of Moscow. The Russian Calvary fought in many other engagements around Europe including the battle at Leipzig.

http://english.ruvr.ru/2012_07_09/Don-Cossacks-will-re-enact-Napoleonic-war/

MIA Pilot Lt Warren G Moxley Accounted For

On May 22, 2012 the status of Fighter Pilot Lt Moxley was changed from MIA to KIA and recovered from the crash site in Germany.

 

http://www.stltoday.com/news/national/wwii-vet-s-remains-are-returned-home-to-missouri/article_d4762766-7eec-5c25-b0db-3b75cf1d1cb2.html

Artifacts Going Moldy

Running a museum requires that the artifacts remain interesting – and just remain intact. Housing them in unheated, in non-environmental controlled area results in items being destroyed over time by humidity, heat, or insects. The Military Museum at Kensington, Prince Edward Island, Canada is experiencing this.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/prince-edward-island/story/2012/07/10/pei-military-museum-mould-584.html

 

Toolbox to the Museum

Ellie Roberts still has the toolbox that she used to build both B-26 Marauders – and the first full production B-29. But it is willed to be given to the Strategic Air and Space Museum when she dies.

“They picked certain people to be on the crew that worked 12 hours a day on the first B-29 built in Omaha, and they picked me to do that. So that's what made me feel kind of special. It was an experience."

 

http://www.sfgate.com/news/article/Hastings-woman-recalls-WWII-work-on-planes-3675781.php

 

Spain, France, New Orleans Louisiana  and a Shipwreck

Spain wanted to limit their losses in the new world, France needed money, the USA wanted land – and a shipwreck made all that possible.

http://www.cannonbeachgazette.com/entertainment/article_72773624-c6f3-11e1-b745-001a4bcf887a.html

 

Last Big Battle in the War of 1812 – was around Mobile Bay

Fought a few days after the Battle of New Orleans – the US Garrison surrendered since they were outnumbered 7 to 1, surrounded, and cut off from any help.

 

http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/13d185804b4345ea91868fc816fecbe2/AL--War-of-1812-Last-Battle

 

Navy Divers to Search Catalina Flying Boat Discovered in the Gulf of St Lawrence

The seaplane sunk during heavy seas in the gulf on November 2, 1942. Four crewmen escaped but the other 5 went down with the ship. A 50 person Navy dive team will try and search the aircraft. It was discovered by accident during a routine underwater mapping survey.

http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5gymwUa_0KrY-kx3-jTBk6u3OGGaA?docId=CNG.826fe8bd777afed3ea0d4aff3a859816.d1

B-17 “Sentimental Journey” at Aurora Airport August 6 thru the 9th

Aerometal International, based at Aurora Airport, is hosting the Commemorative Air Force Arizona Chapter's B-17G Sentimental Journey over the week days of August 6,7,8,9 – right after the Oregon International Air Show.

Ground tours of this WW II Heavy Bomber, along with flights in it, are available. Call 602-448-9415 to arrange a flight in the B-17.

CAF web site: www.azcaf.org

POC at Aerometal is Victoria Nanbu; 503-678-2266 and fax 503-678-2269.

Aerometal International, LLC 

 

Note: I think some portion of the money paid to go for a flight is tax-deductible. Check with them and your tax accountant to find out.

Oregon Chapter News, Archive Loan / Donation, and Contact Information

Oregon Chapter 2012 Meeting dates: February 11; May 12; August 11; November 3

Next Oregon Chapter Meeting August 11, 2012

The August Speaker is Clayton Kelly Groce

Due to his hearing loss, Lt Groce cannot hear well so please WRITE DOWN any questions that you may have for him before his presentation on 3x5 cards (provide at the entrance table) and give them to Tom Davis.

 

Description: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Xlpwfj3mL._SL110_.jpgP-51 Ace Clayton Kelly Groce will be the speaker at the August meeting. Clayton started flying out of Portland Air Base flying in 1942 in Bell P-39 Aircobras and was the first pilot to land at Aurora airport. He wrote an autobiography of his adventures in WW II called “Live Bait”. Amazon link:  Live Bait

 

 

Last meeting’s speaker was Lt Jack Cramer who was the navigator for the B-29 “Goin’ Jessie”; and here is a web site dedicated to the whole crew.

 

http://www.duncanwebsiteservices.com/Goin_Jessie/Speaker.htm

 

If you live in Kansas you can meet the Pilot Charles Chauncey who gives presentations around there.

Oregon International Air Show

The Oregon 8th AFHS chapter will again be manning a booth at the air show this year which is on August 3, 4, and 5th.

 

The U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds will be there this year along with an A-26 Invader (which will fly) as well as a B-17G, “Sentimental Journey”, as of July 30th.

http://www.oregonairshow.com

Oregon Honor Flights

Mike Pungercar is the Oregon coordinator for Honor Flights, which raises money to pay for WW II Veterans to go back to Washington DC to visit the memorial. Currently there are 25 WW II veterans scheduled to go in October to DC from Oregon. Contact Mike to both apply / nominate someone and or to donate funds to help send these veterans to the Memorial. Mike’s email is: pungercar2@msn.com

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.

 

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 


“Milk Run”

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society
History News Update for June 2012

 History News Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

P-40 of the RAF Found in Sahara

Found “intact” after it ditched in the Sahara. Most paint still on it, ammo still there and all the parts. Only the fabric on the various control surfaces have disappeared. Photos by Jakub Perka.
 
 

A Short History of the War of 1812

 
Another of the “forgotten” wars of the USA is the War of 1812. It is also another case where the war was officially over and a battle was still fought. This also occurred during the US Civil War where battles were fought in the Pacific long after the war was over.

Colorizing WW II Newsreels

Ever since TNT Network started colorizing old movies to update them to people who grew up with color TVs as their norm, there has been a rush to take old WW I and newer newsreels and colorize them. Sometimes colorization works, often you can see that it has been dubbed onto the B&W images with less than pleasing results. The French firm Clarke, Costelle & Co. out of Paris has been doing this since 2009, and sometimes the new version even looks correct – most often not.  But they are getting better. They are now doing their third & fourth colorization of historical eras: Apocalypse: World War One and Apocalypse: Cold War.
The WW I colorization will air in August of 2014 – 100 years after the start of that war.
[Editor’s Note: Colorization may re-trigger  a new copyright so none of the color clips can be used for the next 95 years unless paid for. Fair use exempted of course.]

In the Ambulance Service in WW I

Bad eyesight did not get you out of WW I – they put you to work somewhere and for Richard Bryner it was driving an ambulance from the front lines to the rear. The front line did not end at the trench line, it often went back a two to three miles behind there since shelling often occurred to block men and supplies from reaching the front line and you were always a target.

NAVY POW Camps in Germany

Germany, like the allies, grouped POWs according to rank and service. British Merchant sailors had their own camp for them and passed their time racing horses.
 
A scrapbook of the years of the men is up for auction.
 
 

WW I Pilot May Have been Found

A wreck discovered on mountain peak on Thasos may lead to the solving of what happened to Flight Lt Warner Hutchins Peberdy when he failed to return from a recon mission to Macedonia.

A WW I Monument  Damaged in Car Accident Rebuilt

A monument erected to honor a Victoria Cross holder John Bernard Croak who died in WW I in France has been rebuilt and restored in Glace Bay Nova Scotia.
All soldiers who died under British Command in all wars (prior to now) remain buried where they were killed; they were not shipped back to their home areas to be re-buried where relatives can visit their graves.
 

A Site where the Soviet Veterans can talk about their experiences

After the 2nd World War, aka The Great Patriotic War as it was (and still is) known in Russia, many stories could not be told – especially if anything critical of the USSR handling of the war was in it. Now, before those still left alive die, their stories are being recorded and presented.

May 9 in Russia – Still A Victory Day

Over 20 million Soviet citizens (including military) died during WW II. It is an astounding number, but the Eastern Front was a massive battlefield from June 22, 1941 till May 9, 1945. Germany had  10 million soldiers counted as casualties in the East (including those who died after being captured, around 3 ½ million) out of the total 13.4 million killed, wounded or captured during the war.

Outdoor Museum near Moscow

30 Kilometers north of Moscow (around 21 miles) on the site where the first winter T-34 lead counter-offensive started in 1941, there exists an outdoor museum showing the military equipment used in WW II.
 

PRAVDA 100 years old

Started by Lenin, as a legally recognized newspaper by the Tsarist state on May 5, 1912, PRAVDA means “The Truth” in Russian.
The other main newspaper during the Soviet era was Izvestia which means ‘delivered messages’ (usually translated as ‘news’).
Old Soviet saying: There is no truth in “News” and no news in “Truth”.

From Singing to Horses to Singing on Stage

Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau was a soldier on the Eastern Front in the winter of 1943 caring for horses, often singing to them as he kept care of them. After being released as a POW in 1948 he took to singing on stage in Germany, England – Coventry Cathedral - and other locations in the world. He died at the age of 86 on May 18th.
 
In 1945 40% of all German units still had horses as their main transportation method. Germany started the war with 70% of all units using horses as their main transportation equipment. 10 Tons of fodder a day was needed to keep a German infantry division’s horses fed.

Secret Missions: Dangerous Before You Even Start

During WW II going on a secret mission meant that danger started once you accepted it – you could be killed before actually going into enemy territory. FBI Special Agent Harold Haberfeld out of New York  was killed when the plane he was in crashed taking him on the mission to North Africa.

Getting Trench Foot at the Battle of Cassino

As a replacement infantryman in WWII 'Bing' Crosby W. Powell was assigned to L company in the 168th Regiment of the 34th Division just before the heavy winter fighting at Cassino. Wounded he was recovered enough to land at Anzio. "At Anzio, you were safer at the front (lines) than at the back."

With the 79th Fighter Group in Italy

When the Americans invaded Italy in 1943 at Salerno, after capturing Sicily in July/August , the invasion went badly due to the defensive line the Germans had set up around all likely invasion sites. Air power made the difference when the 79th (flying Curtiss P-40s) was called in to attack enemy gun positions around the beachhead – with a warning to stay above 1,500 feet since Navy Gunners on assault ships were known to shoot at any airplane near them with their .50 caliber or 20 mm and 40 mm anti-aircraft  guns. (During the invasion of Sicily 23 C-47s carrying paratroopers were shot down by Navy ships and another 37 damaged.) "We didn't dare go down on the deck, like we wanted to, and come in at them. We were told to stay at 1,500 feet, which meant we were sitting ducks for the German gunners."

Joining the Woman’s Army Corps

With her brothers in the Army, one a pilot flying B-25s in the South Pacific, Aylett Griffin Irving refused a commission so she could get into the war faster. She ended up meeting the son of the last Calvary General in the Army on a ship to the South Pacific and marrying him. Her other brother was awarded a medal for liberating nurses in 1944 that had been captured by the Japanese in 1942 outside of Manila before the Japanese could kill them.

Going Up Mount Cassino and seeing your Cousin Coming Down

As part of the 3rd Infantry division Jack Ziccarelli landed at Salerno and fought his up the Italian boot. While crossing the Volturno River he was lightly wounded in the left arm and leg, but not enough to have him sent to a hospital right then so he stayed with his unit. Going up St. Nick’s hill later on he saw his cousin who was in another unit coming down. Both ended up severely wounded but alive.

Italy Supreme Court agrees with The International Court on War Crimes Compensation

The International Court at The Hague had ruled that Italians cannot sue Germany for compensation since a nation is immune from being sued by individuals.

From Ball Turret to Bombardier

After flying 30 missions as a ball turret gunner Sgt. Ray Fairman was promoted to being a “toggler” – dropping the bombs when he saw the lead plane drop theirs from the bombardier position. He flew in the 40th Bomb Wing, 92 Bomb Group 325th Bomber squadron in the 8th Air Force – and he always carried a camera.
The Germans knew his number:
” Then there was the time the plane was hit by shrapnel. One piece ripped through the side of the plane and lodged in Fairman’s parachute pack. When the jagged metal was removed upon landing, he saw that it had a number stamped on it by the ever-efficient German war machine. The number was exactly the same as his service number: 36876493.”
He flew 42 ½ missions – being shot down on April 13, 1945.

389th Bomber Group Museum at Hethel

If you are in Norfolk, England, on June 10 you can visit the museum between 10 AM and 2 PM. Parking charge of 2 pounds.
The 389th Bomb Group (Heavy) flew Consolidated B-24 Liberators out of the airbase.Like many former airbases it is not easy to get to.
“To get to the museum from the A11 Wymondham bypass, take the exit signed Mulbarton and Lotus Cars. Follow the signs for Lotus Cars and turn left into Potash Lane. Go past the Lotus Car factory gates to where the road is closed. A farm entrance is on the right and go through it, following the signs to the exhibition.”
Now imagine trying to get to a base during WW II when ALL road signs had been taken down in the summer of 1940!

With Very Little Training a Replacement Rifleman during the “Bulge”

Told he had bad eyes when he tried to join at 18, Russell Pollitt went to work instead then got drafted in July and was given two sets of eyeglasses. After a short time of basic training was shipped out in November for Europe. He ended up in Company C,  58th Armored Infantry, 8th Armored Division.
When wounded and pinned down during combat he had to wait it out and saw someone crawling toward him.
“But when he got within, oh, about six to eight feet, he turned his head around sideways. At that time the German made a helmet that went down this way, and down that way. Our helmets didn’t do that, they went around the other way. So that told me he was the enemy. And I don’t know what he detected about me, but just before I shot him he detected who I was too and he was trying to get his gun up to shoot me but I beat him.”

Added to the Black Watch Honor Roll

Serving throughout the war from 1914 untill he was wounded in 1918, Lieutenant Patrick Wright Anderson started in the infantry in the Black Watch but was wounded while flying  as an Observer in the Royal Flying Corps in 18 Squadron on 27 June, 1918. He died in 1921 of his wounds.
 

Rescued by a Sub in the Pacific

His B-24 Liberator plane forced to ditch in the lonely Pacific Ocean after a mission to Guam, Howard Mann and his other 8 crew-members floated in the Pacific for 9 days till a sub rescued them.
 
 

Flying B-29 missions out of China

Before the capture of the Marianas, where Saipan and Tinian are at, B-29s flew missions out of China – and it was not easy. Capt. Oliver B. Eisan was a lead navigator of these B-29s during this China time but was shot down on the January 6, 1945 mission to Omura, which is near Nagasaki when a Japanese fighter shot out their #2 and #3 engines which later caused a fire on the starboard side and the plane went into a vertical dive into a bank of clouds never to be seen again.
 
 

Flying Escort Missions over Germany

“It was a lot of fun until they started shooting at us.” John Huff was a P-51 pilot from February 1944 till October 1944 flying out of England in the 339th Fighter Group 503rd Squadron. He was at the Seattle Museum of Flight during the visit of EAA’s Aluminum Overcast was there in May.
 
Alfred Soo was also at the museum, but he did not finish his combat tour, he was shot down by flak over the target in November of 1944.
 
 

B-24 Ball Turret Gunner out of Spinazzola, Italy

The 15th Air Force had the same strategic mission as the 8th – they just did it out of the mud of Italy instead of the fog of England. Larry Hilte started flying his missions on Valentine’s day in 1945 and his first mission was a visit to Vienna.
 
They took a brand new B-24 to Italy called “Pleasure Bent” but like any brand new a/c it was taken away and given to another crew so they inherited “Yugo Kid”. On March 1, 1945 “Pleasure Bent” was hit and went down and all the crew in it were killed.
 
 

Shot Down in “Our Baby” over France

Flying a B-24 out of Lavenham, where the 389th Bomb Group, was based, it was the lead a/c of the group when shot up by flak the crew had to bail out. On board that day was Col Beirne Lay Jr – who wrote “12 O’Clock High”. John Watson was a ball turret gunner and though he evaded for a few weeks, he was eventually captured and became a POW – but not before he and some 200 other POWs were sent to Buchenwald Concentration camp before being sent to Stalag Luft III – “The Great Escape” camp.
 
 

“Diamond Lil” Nose Gear Fails

The only other airworthy B-24, Diamond Lil, nose gear collapsed at Charlotte Douglass International Airport on May 26th.
 
 
The B-24 “Witchcraft” is touring the west Coast and will be at Salem Oregon on June 6 thru the 8th at McNary Field. The P-51 and B-17 will also be there. After that they move on to Pasco Washington. http://www.collingsfoundation.org/cf_schedule-wof.htm
 

Wendover Tower Restored

The Control Tower at Wendover Air Base, which saw lots of action training B-29 crews near the end of the war, has been fully restored and was re-dedicated on May 31, 2012 as a museum. There maybe only one or two other control towers left in the US of that type.
 
 

Witness to the Attack on Sydney Harbor on May 31, 1942

During WW II a Japanese submarine shelled and torpedoed the harbor at Sydney. Don Roberts was awake and heard the shells coming in. The USS Chicago was in the harbor at the time. One ship was sunk, the converted ferry HMAS Kuttabul, killing 21 sailors.
 
 
 

Mapping the attack on Japan

At the start of WW II every nation had a real lack of detailed maps in the area they were fighting in – even in 1944 maps of Normandy were based on Michelin maps (Editor: and state so on the one I have.)  so the Map Davison of the OSS created over 8,000 separate maps as they were needed – from high altitude 1:150,000 to detailed 1:10,000 scale maps.
 
As the war progressed the level of detail in the maps would change leaving out civilian items and leaving only military ones –even if next to a pure civilian area.
 
Two researches, David Fedman of Stanford and Cary Karacas, did a study of how the maps changed during the war against Japan and track the destruction of the core of 65 cities in Japan.
 
 

Missing Corsair Pilot Finally Located

During a mission to Rabaul Papua New Guinea Lt Moszek Murray Zanger collided with his wingman over New Guinea and bailed out. He made it out to sea but was picked up by a Japanese patrol boat and held captive for 6 months before he was deliberately killed by the Japanese and then buried next to an airfield. They finally located his aircraft crash site.
 
 

New Monument Dedicated in Vancouver, Washington

Over 9,000 merchant seamen died during WW II, and very few monuments exist for them. Tauno Alanko was a crewman on the Liberty ship star of Oregon in the Caribbean when it was sunk by the U-162 on August 30, 1942. One of the crewmen was killed during the attack.
 
The new memorial is the Merchant Seaman Memorial on Vancouver's Veterans Affairs campus.

If you can locate the Star of Oregon under the ocean – it still has its’ 1,600 pounds of gold dust on board.
 
 

Shooting Down a Japanese Pilot – then saving him

During an attack against his ship, where he was assigned to the medical unit, he was on deck tending to the wounded when a plane came at his ship so he jumped to a gun and shot down the aircraft. Then the captain came to him and told him to help out a Japanese pilot who they just captured on the other side – and it was the pilot of the plane he had just shot down.
 
 

B-17 “Lacey Lady” BBQ & Event July 28th

Description: WOF_fnl_sm.pngFrom 10 Am till 3 PM there will be an all family style celebration for the 65th year of theB-17 Flying Fortress being on Milwaukie Blvd. Free to attend. A Family style BBQ food offering is available during this time.
 
 
 
From 6 to 10 PM there is an adult only event. Tickets required. $35.00 each or 2 for $60.00 advance purchase price.
 
Contact Terry@thebomber.com or call 503-654-6491 RSVP, sponsor, or to volunteer.

Fantasy of Flight Events (Florida)

If you are around central Florida on June 8 & 9 they have an “open cockpit” day – but for only those with annual passes. Don’t know if you can buy an annual pass on the spot then get into a cockpit.
Some of their future restoration projects:
  • B-29 Fertile Myrtle
  • P-38
  • Hellcat
  • Panther F9F
  • Me 108 Taifun

 

Oregon Chapter News, Archive Loan / Donation, and Contact Information

Oregon Chapter 2012 Meeting dates: February 11; May 12; August 11; November 3

Next Oregon Chapter Meeting August 11, 2012

The August  Speaker

P-51 Ace Clayton Kelly Groce will be the speaker at the August meeting. Clayton started flying out of Portland Air Base flying in 1942 in Bell P-39 Aircobras and was the first pilot to land at Aurora airport. He wrote an autobiography of his adventures in WW II called “Live Bait”. Amazon link:  Live Bait
 

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.
 
Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.
 
Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon
Tom Philo
17502 SW Kimmel Ct
Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877
 
 
The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 

“Milk Run”
(added 4/4/12)

Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society

History News Update for April 2012

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

Oregon 8th AFHS Chapter News and how to share YOUR history with others through our 8th AFHS Chapter is on the last page.

 

UK Air Shows for 2012

The four WW II related that are at Duxford:

The Jubilee Air Show Sunday May 27

Flying Legends weekend of June 30 & July 1

Duxford Air Show weekend of September 8 & 9

The Autumn Air Show on Sunday October 14

 

In the Marines at Tarawa and Iwo

Gene "Tim" Shawaryn, now 90, was 16 when he saw a newsreel about the Marines and decided to join them. He landed at Red Beach at Tarawa at 9:30 on November 20, 1943. “Amid a storm of machine gun fire and artillery shells, Shawaryn finally got out carrying an M-1 carbine, 12 half-pound blocks of TNT, two Bangalore torpedoes, two 1 lb. blocks of TNT and fuses and blasting caps.” He followed Sgt. Marion Gaudet over the seawall but he and Sgt Gaudet were both wounded later on in the day – and both were wounded again at Iwo Jima.

 http://www.tcpalm.com/news/2012/mar/03/veterans-spotlight-palm-city-veteran-was-in-ww/

 

National Eighth Air Force YouTube Page

The National 8th AFHS, through Pat Keeley, posts videos onto their channel from the reunions and other venues.  Their YouTube page is: http://www.youtube.com/user/8thafhs?feature=g-all-f

 

A short 5 Minute Dogfight during The “Battle of Britain”

A video fictionalized account of a dogfight using both live action and modern animation techniques between a Bf-109E vs. a Spitfire Mk I during the Battle of Britain. The account is fictionalized – but the ending was true for some pilots.

 

http://player.vimeo.com/video/31202906?autoplay=1

 

On the Ground at Hickham on December 7, 1941

Major James F. Walls USAF-Ret. passed away March 4, 2012 in Smyrna Tennessee.  After graduating from high school Maj. Walls enlisted in the Army Air Corp and was trained as an aircraft mechanic.  Assigned to the 4th Reconnaissance Squadron based at Hickam Airfield in Hawaii he was there when the Japanese attacked on December 7th 1941.  Literally surviving with only the clothes on his back during that day in infamy, Maj. Walls went to flight school and ended up qualifying to fly gliders, fighters and transports.  After retiring from the United States Air Force in 1959 he opened a restaurant named the Omni Hut which remains family owned and is still in business.  He is survived by his wife Sally and 5 children. 

http://www.tennessean.com/article/D4/20120306/NEWS01/303050035/Omni-Hut-founder-Walls-dies-92

Liberty Ship Davy Crockett Removal / Salvage

It had been tied up along the Columbia River for 10+ years and was being salvaged for scrap – then they took too much from it and it broke in half. The Coast Guard stepped in and used money in paid into an account for just that and finished the salvage clean it up.

http://www.pmmonlinenews.com/2011/12/best-practices-diving-and-salvage.html

In a related shipping note Cunard Line of England registered Queen Elizabeth, Queen Mary 2, and Queen Victoria cruise ships under the Flag of Bermuda. This was likely due to the regulatory requirement to pay ship's personnel the same wages as people working in the UK. The QM2 was also recently refurbished by the Blohm & Voss shipyard in Hamburg.

 

Unsinkable “Stoker” John Priest – Sailed on 6 ships – of which 4 sank including the Titantic

Serving on the Olympic (sister ship of the Titantic) which collision with a navy ship along with Captain Smith and was damaged, he went to Titantic – sunk (1912), Alcantara - sunk (1916), Britannic – sunk (1916), Donegel – sunk (1917).

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-northern-ireland-17543632

 

How many “National” WW I memorials in the USA?

The first, and only “National” memorial to WW I is in Kansas City, Kansas, but Washington DC built a memorial to ITS’ veterans along the mall. Some are trying to get it designated as the “National” WW I but the DC Government says it was built to honor those what died who were from DC, and are listed on it, not the whole nation.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/05/usa-monument-war-idUSL2E8E5B2L20120305

Born in the Trenches – A Donkey received the “Dicken Medal”

The medal is the highest award that can be given to an animal in the British Army. The donkey was born in 1916 and served throughout WW I in the front lines – being wounded three times.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2119338/The-donkey-born-First-World-War-trench-mascot-British-troops.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

 

Germany & Greek twinned Towns

Germany is the economic powerhouse of Europe, and like many nations it has twinned towns to promote trade with other nation’s towns, but the relationship with Greece is still complicated.

During WW II over 300,000 Greeks died as a result of combat, disease, and starvation while Germany occupied Greece.

http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/03/08/uk-germany-greece-partnership-idUSLNE82701H20120308

 

WW I Artist Archive – Humorous drawings from a WW I German Artist

German artist Albert Heim drew lighthearted fare from the trenches of WW I due to a commission by Lt General Theodor von Wundt of the 26th Division. The collection of 80 drawings is being auctioned off.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2113408/Humorous-German-cartoons-life-frontline-World-War-I-unearthed-theyre-funny.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

 

Why Germany fought on – a new book, The End, by Ian Kershaw examines this fact

During the last 10 months of the war 2.6 MILLION German soldiers died, (about 1/2 of all soldiers killed during the whole war) and around 900,000 civilians died – and this book he examines why the soldiers fought on when they knew the war was lost.

 

The End: Hitler’s Germany, 1944-45

 

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/8697602/The-End-by-Ian-Kershaw-review.html

 

Possible memorial to Children Killed in 1945

On March 5, 1945, a Do-24 aircraft evacuating children from Russian forces was shot down into Lake Resko – where it still remains. If enough money is raised they will raise the remains still in the aircraft for re-burial and monument.

Almost a million German soldiers and civilians remain unaccounted for from WW II.

http://www.thelocal.de/national/20120306-41161.html

 

In Dnipropetrovsk the organization there has discovered and reburied 130 Red Army soldiers, 18 German and 2 civilians they discovered.

The German government plans to have most large scale search activities completed by 2015. Some 400,000 Germans died in the Ukraine area of operations during World War II.

http://www.day.kiev.ua/224782

 

A Combat Nurse in North Africa

Dorthy Pacenta was on duty in North Africa five months after she joined the US Army in 1943 ending up in Marseilles at the end of the war.

 

"In summer we couldn't take temperatures in the afternoon because the thermometers would go up to the top."

 

Over 59,000 nurses were in the Army.

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2012/03/patriotism_and_a_yen_for_actio.html

 

Where’s the Border? 2,500 years of disputes between Eritrea and Ethiopia

From when the area was known as “Punt” 2,500 years ago, the borders of Ethiopia has been altered by European and African powers ever since. And it still goes on.

http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/27/war-over-a-one-horse-town/

 

New WWII Memorial in Phoenix Arizona

To be finished by December 7, 2012 in time for the 71st Anniversary of Pearl Harbor, Governor Jan Brewer signed the legislation recently.

http://www.azcentral.com/arizonarepublic/local/articles/2012/03/14/20120314phoenix-wwii-memorial.html

 

A Forward Artillery Assistant in the 88th Division

Cloyce Edmon was assigned that job after being in a Tank Destroyer Unit (disbanded), then kitchen duty in the 88th Division, and when fed-up with that - and he complained about it -  he was assigned as a relay operator then re-assigned to a forward artillery controller for the rest of the war.

 

http://www.timesreporter.com/communities/x1612613722/Phila-World-War-II-veteran-defied-odds?zc_p=1

 

Ancient India and NAZI Germany

The writings of ancient Indians had an influence in Germany since the mid-1800s and directly affected the leaders of NAZI Germany.

http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/319400/20120326/heinrich-himmler-ss-nazi-germany-india-hindusim.htm

 

Appeasement as a Policy prior to WW II

The meanings of words are often altered over time and their original meanings at their time of creation gets forgotten. Appeasement is one such word that had a different meaning back in the 1930s than it does not when people hear it.

 

How it was used by Britain and Australia to prevent WW II in context of the times it was used changes everything.

 

Australia and Appeasement: Imperial Foreign Policy and the Origins of World War II
By Christopher Waters
I.B. Tauris, 310pp, $39.95 (HB)

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/news/arts/australian-appeasers-guilty-in-failure-to-stop-world-war-ii/story-e6frg8nf-1226299580019

 

P-47 Pilot Donald E. Hillman dead at 93

He flew 145 combat missions in his 10 months of combat in the 8th and 9th Air Force over Europe before being captured. He was in Stalag Luft III, the “Great Escape” camp after the 1944 escape. He lived in Seattle and worked for Boeing.

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/localnews/2017834043_hillmanobit25m.html

 

 

C-47 Dakota from 1950 Malayan Emergency

The passengers and crew of a C-47 which went down in 1950 during the Malayan conflict with England were finally buried in the Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2115346/Malayan-Emergency-victims-laid-t-rest-60-years-RAF-plane-crashes-jungle.html

 

A 250 Acre Combat Town

The French and British built a town in France, Jeoffrecourt,  outside of Reims to train soldiers in urban combat.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-2118028/A-modern-invasion-France-The-extraordinary-purpose-built-80-million-theatre-war.html

 

Wings of Freedom Tour

The annual “Wings of Freedom” aircraft tour around the USA has started again. The tour includes the  B-17 Flying Fortress, B-24 Liberator and P-51 Mustang.

 

Another B-17, The Yankee Lady, is also out on tour.

 

This is the Collings Foundation annual tour.

http://www.collingsfoundation.org/cf_schedule-wof.htm

 

Was there a B-24 Named “Spirit of West Tech”?

During WW II Cleveland’s West Technical High School raised $275,076 to purchase a B-24 Liberator in 1944 and have it named after them. The money was sent but no one knows if there was ever a bomber named for them or not. Now they want to find out.

According to the B-24 Nose Art Name Directory no aircraft was ever named for them.

http://www.cleveland.com/metro/index.ssf/2012/03/post_1.html

 

Honeymoon at Attlebridge

A newlywed couple travels to Attlebridge, where the 466th Bomb Group was stationed, in order to visit where his grandfather flew from during WW II.

They were married under the wing of a DC-3.

http://www.edp24.co.uk/news/newlyweds_remember_grandfather_who_was_a_member_of_usaaf_466th_bombardment_group_at_attlebridge_airfield_1_1332453

 

Operation Cornflakes

Battles were also fought by propaganda means during World War II against Germany. The British dropped lots of leaflets during the war, and many of their early raids over Germany in 1939 were JUST to drop propaganda leaflets. Once the US joined the war the OSS – Office of Strategic Service – started their propaganda efforts against Germany. The OSS, using units of the 8th AF, flew B-17s from England dropping leaflets in all of Europe to aid this effort, but in 1945 they got even more devious by getting the German mail service to deliver forged mail and propaganda for them using P-47s from the 15th Air Force.

Over the course of Operation Cornflakes, 320 bags of fake mail were dropped, containing more than 96,000 pieces of propaganda mail.  

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2111038/Operation-Cornflakes-How-Allies-delivered-propaganda-Nazi-Germany--just-time-breakfast.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

 

James Morehead, Ace, Dies at 95

Flying P-40s out of Darwin, Australia, in 1942 he achieved his first three victories against a Japanese bomber formation when leading his squadron. He achieved his last victory by shooing down a Bf-109 over Romania in 1944.

“Aerial gunnery is a matter of interception. You cannot look at the target, shoot at the target and ever hit the target. You’re going to hit eight feet behind if you point right at him.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/03/20/us/james-morehead-world-war-ii-flying-ace-dies-at-95.html

 

Paul Crumb – Lived for Real what appears in Movie Scripts

Joining the Army when he was 18, he first saw combat as part of K Company of the 47th Regiment of the 9th Infantry, nicknamed "Raiders", during the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944. From that he then ended up at the Ludendorff Bridge, at Remagan Germany, and his unit was one of the ones that first went across the bridge to capture it.

http://www.ocala.com/article/20120220/ARTICLES/120229988?p=2&tc=pg

 

Another Scene from a Movie – also real

In the movie “12 O’Clock High” a B-17 tries to land with a non-pilot at the controls and explodes. In real life this did occur and two airmen earned the Medal of Honor for their actions. Staff Sgt. Archibald Mathies and Lt. Walter Truemper died while trying to land at Glatton air base in England.

http://www.malmstrom.af.mil/news/story.asp?id=123291033

 

Glenn Miller Mystery – Another Clue

A plane spotter’s logbook recording of a Norseman on December 15 while he worked at Woodley airfield adds another clue to the mystery.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-berkshire-16517128

 

Lake Pontchartrain and PBYs

New Orleans is home to the National WW II Museum but before that it was also home to where PBYs - “Catalina” - flying boats were built. The plant is still there.

http://www.nola.com/175years/index.ssf/2012/02/our_times_1943_aircraft_factor.html

 

Paul Allen’s Ilyushin Il-2 Shturmovik

The plane was assembled from four different IL-2s with the primary being Il-2M3 serial number 30540 built in 1943 and shot down in 1944.

"It has been decades since anyone has been able to get an Il-2 engine, the Mikulin AM-38F, to function. So, the FHC aircraft flies with a left-turning Allison V-1710-113 1,475-horsepower engine from a P-38 Lighting fighter."

http://www.seattlepi.com/business/boeing/article/Unique-WWII-Soviet-fighter-reassembled-in-Everett-3312000.php

 

Pieces form the Past

Gerald Smith gets in the mail pieces of his B-26 from Italy. Shot down and captured in November of 1944 an Italian who witnessed the crash collected pieces and sent them to the pilot’s family who then sent it onto co-pilot Smith.

http://www.fosters.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20120226/GJNEWS_01/702269912/-1/FosNEWS

 

Hunting for Buried Airplanes

Freeman AAF , http://www.indianamilitary.org/FreemanAAF/Museum/FF_museum.html , was where hundreds of German aircraft were sent after the war for evaluation – and some of them may be buried on the airfield.

http://www.wdrb.com/story/17041764/nazi-secrets-wwii-planes-buried-under-seymour-ind-airport

 

Chadderton Factory - Birthplace of the Lancaster - Shuts Down

Opening in 1939 as Avro Headquarters, the factory built Bristol Blenheims, Manchesters, then Lancasters and others.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-17234626

 

Oregon Chapter News, Archive Loan / Donation, and Contact Information

Oregon Chapter 2012 Meeting dates: February 11; May 12; August 11; November 3

Next Oregon Chapter Meeting May 12, 2012

The May speaker

Jack Cramer was the navigator on the "Goin Jessie", a B29 in the 5th Sq, 9th Bomb Group, 313th Wing, 20th AF flying out of North Field, Tinian, in the Marianas. He flew 35 combat missions with one of them to Iwo Jima and one to Truk and the other 33 missions were to the home islands of Japan. In his talk he plans to describe some of his experiences and how the missions he flew were the same in some ways and different in others than the missions of the 8th Air Force flew over Germany.

Oregon Chapter Executive Board Meetings

All members can attend any Executive board meeting. The Board meets at the Elks Lodge three Saturdays before the regular membership meeting. If you can spare up to 2 hours between 10 AM and Noon you can also join the board and help make our chapter a continuing success.

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.

 

Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon

Tom Philo

17502 SW Kimmel Ct

Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877

secretary@8thafhsoregon.com

http://www.8thafhsoregon.com

 

The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.

 

“Milk Run”
Oregon Chapter 8th Air Force Historical Society News Update
October 2011

 History News à Readers, where’s your story?

8th AFHS Oregon Chapter News and how to share history with others on the last page.
 

The Fate of Rosalie Ann(s) of the 452 Bombardment Group (Heavy)

From the daughter of Frederick Popielski I got an email request on finding out about the aircraft named Rosalie Ann. In about an hour of searching (Web plus using Fold3.com, which used to be called Footnote.com) to find the MACRs I came up with this info on the two a/c.
 
Rosalie Ann: A joint name honoring two of the crew members’ wives. The lead navigator was Marvin Byer whose wife's name was Rosalie. The pilot was Ed Hartman whose wife's name was Ann. B-17 F #42-38145.
 
42-38145 collided with a B-17 of 288th BG and crashed at New Buckenham May 19, 1944.  2 of the crew were killed, 8 bailed out.  The other B-17 landed safely.
 
Another plane was now named Rosalie Ann II, in the 452nd  729 Sqd which was a B-17G #44-8201.
 
It was shot down on 2 Jan 1945.
 
One of the crew was killed, the rest became POWs.
 
From the MACR:
Shortly after bombs away (1114 hrs) A/C 201 received a direct flak hit between #3 and #4 engines, setting the #3 engine on fire eventually. The A/C went into a spiral and as it neared the ground it leveled off and crashed into woods at approximately 4950N-0650E, setting the woods on fire. 5 to 9 chutes were reported as seen to open at 10 – 12,000 feet.
POW:
1st Lt Vise, Richard George
Capt Martin, Ralph Hiller
2nd Lt Kamas, Lewis M
1st Lt Baghner, joseph
1st Lt Kordatzky, Howard Walter
T/Sgt Achenbach, Donald A
S/Sgt Richardson, Clyde E
1st Lt McDougall, William Robert
 
KIA:
T/Sgt Martinek, Albin C. Jr.

In Page 7 of the MACR it stated that he reported he was hit over the intercom before he bailed out.

Boeing’s Virtual Walk-around of the Boeing 737

 
 

Eaker Cups Update

Sir, Per your article in the Milk Run newsletter of September 2010 on General Eaker and the silver cups.  Currently the “Eaker Bowl” display – consisting of the engraved silver punch bowl, ladle, and five of the nine cups – are on display at Headquarters, Eighth Air Force at Barksdale AFB, Louisiana.   Together this display constitutes our heraldic device and provides today’s Eighth Air Force a physical link to its storied past, heritage, achievements and sacrifices. 
 
 
Once a year the entire display is carefully packed and shipped to CORONA where the senior Air Force leadership and commanders meet and where the Eaker Bowl is displayed at the formal CORONA banquet. 
 
Beyond this exception, the Eaker Bowl is respectively displayed in its own cabinet in the Command Section where dignitaries and VIPs visiting the Eighth view it and where the Eighth’s top leaders pass by it when beginning their duty day.  Next to the cabinet is a picture of General Ira C. Eaker and the picture of the entire nine cup set (attached).   Attached also is a picture of the current five-cup display of the Eaker Bowl out of its cabinet.
  
 
Lane Callaway, Historian, Eighth Air Force (Air Forces Strategic)

Training plane used by Tuskegee Airmen given to Smithsonian

 
 

Ross W. Young - 15th AF Bombardier

 
 

Buck Tape

What was the original use of duct tape?
Seal ammunition boxes 
 
Permacel, formerly a division of Johnson & Johnson, originally developed duct tape in 1942 during World War II as a rubber-based adhesive tape with a durable fabric backing that resisted water for use as sealing tape on ammunition cases. J&J plant managers simply took their existing cloth medical adhesive tape, added a waterproof plastic layer with a more aggressive adhesive, and produced it in olive drab (OD) green to match the ammunition cans. Because of these properties, it was also used to repair military equipment quickly, including jeeps, firearms, and aircraft. The slang name "duck tape" was created by the military personnel due to its ability to repel moisture like water off a duck's back.
 
There is a picture of a Navy F4U Corsair with white outlines around the cowl and for years they thought it was a paint job – not! It is “duck tape” on the cowl to keep the oil from the radial engine from getting onto the canopy. The dyes used in the OD tape quickly faded in the tropical sun and thus it LOOKED white to the camera due to the fading. Early camouflaged  uniforms of the Marines also quickly faded from green to lightened green color after a few months and they stopped using them till that problem was fixed - you do not want a bright light green / tan uniform in a green jungle!
 
Other slang names for it are now “100 Mile an Hour tape”, MacGyvver tape, and likely others.
 
 

Author of “Through Hell For Hitler” Dead at 88

 
 
 
Captain Gaje Ghale, VC
 
 

British Military Maneuvers Before WW I

A book published in Towcester covers the 1913 military maneuvers that were held in Northamptonshire which allowed the British to fight a maneuver war that they had trained for in the opening months of the First World War.
 
Unlike desk games which only tested command and control, this put real forces on the move in the field – like what we did in 1941 in the Louisiana maneuvers.
 
 

Two Wars, Two Sons, Two Deaths

One was killed in August of 1918, then a grandson was killed over Burma in 1944. Both named George.
 
 

Germany’s WW I Battle Plan – Never Really a Plan

A new book out “The Real German War Plan, 1904-1914” delves into the history of the famous “Schlieffen Plan” that never was.  Terence Zuber, a retired US Army Officer, wrote this book.
 
Part of German change in strategy was due to the French “75” quick firing field gun – and the German’s lack of an equivalent. In the open terrain of France a battery of these could annihilate a German Division when caught in the open without any artillery support in a mobile battle.
 
Stroud, Gloucester/Charleston, SC.: The History Press, 2011. Pp. ii, 190. Maps, notes, index. $19.95 paper. ISBN: 0752456644.
 
 

Capturing Doodlebugs in World War II

As part of the British Signal Corps working with the artillery and sending out dispatch riders to other units, Bill Merritt captured a few of these in the Netherlands.
 
 

New book about the siege of Leningrad in WW II

Anna Reid has written a 491 page book detailing the 900 days that Leningrad was under “siege”. The full title is Leningrad: The Epic Siege Of World War II and how it unfolded, and how the Soviet Government reacted to it.
 
“And there is the matter of cannibalism. Soviet authorities made a nice distinction between corpse-eating, which was frowned upon, and murder for food, which was viewed like any other murder. By December 1942, about 2,015 people had been arrested on cannibalism charges.”
 
 
 
(Due to Lake Lakota there never was a FULL siege of the city – supplies got across the lake throughout the battle.)

Russian WW II Epic – Burnt by the Sun 2: Citadel

Not released outside of Russia part two of an epic has been selected to be nominated to be the Best Foreign Film category for the Oscars.
 
 
 

Between Hitler and a Hard Place

A new book written by a Russian Front veteran Rolf Panny, who served at the front from mid-1943 until he was wounded in early 1944, as an signal corps / infantryman with the 30th Division, Regiment 26, near Staraya Russia.
 
Description: 2011-10-Leningrad-Staraya-Russia-2
 
 

To the Bitter End – Why Germany fought On To Total Defeat

 
Ian Kershaw new book covers the last 10 months of the war in Europe and explains why the German Army and people fought on even when they knew that they were going to lose.
 
 

A Beer Stein Returns

Bought for a pittance after the war by a veteran, the stein was just something on the mantle for many years till curiosity got the WW II veteran’s son into finding out more about it.
 
 

WW II Wreck Worth $200 Million

Sunk by a U-Boat in February of 1941, the SS Gairsoppa, which might have been carrying up to 7 million ounces of silver, was discovered by Odyssey Marine exploration around 300 miles off the coast of Ireland.
 
 

SAS WW II Operational Log / Diary to Be Published

A member of the SAS created and kept a 500 page+ diary of the SAS during WW II – and then kept it in his house for over 50 years before donating it to the regiment history collection – then it was also unknown for many years thereafter.
The BBC will now be publishing a copy of it.
 
 

Bengal Famine 1943:-1945 - When More People live there than Food

During WW II shipping losses from 1939 thru 1945 stopped the worldwide movement of food and required that military goods often had a higher priority than moving food around. Add a growing India population who did not grow enough food on their own to this and you get a famine.
 
Unlike the deliberate Japanese caused one in Vietnam, this was caused by shipping shortages and allowing local governments in India to manage their own affairs.
 
Note: a very biased article.
 
 

Staff Sgt. Meceslaus T. Miaskiewicz – KIA May 1944 – Returned Home 2011

 
Shot down over Yugoslavia in their B-17 “Daisy Mae” of the 347 Bomb Squadron was hit by flak with three bailing out and the rest killed when the plane hit the ground. 7 crew members were removed in 1947 – but likely a language barriers with the 1947 recovery team did not realize that another member of the crew was buried elsewhere.
 
 

“Bombs Away” – Coffee Table Book Published

Written by John R Bruning is primarily a 250+ photographic book about the Allied bombing campaign against Germany in World War Two. 
 
 

Boeing’s Plant #2 Gone

 
The last big piece of Plant #2, where 6,981 B-17 Flying Fortresses were produced, was taken down on September 24, 2011.
 
 

“Naughty But Nice” Crew buried at Arlington National Cemetery

 
Shot down in 1943 over New Guinea, only 1 crewman bailed out and survived being a POW of the Japanese. After he found parts of the plane in 1985, more remains were recovered in 2001 but could not be further identified – so all the four that were identified in 2001 were buried in the same casket. Some had previously been buried as “Unknown” in Hawaii and were positively identified via DNA.
 
“Gionet, 68, who lives in Portland, Ore., said it was about a year ago that he learned his father’s remains had been recovered. Somewhat amazingly, he said he received a knock on the door from an Army colonel and sergeant just after he had finished watching a movie called “The Messenger” where the main character is an officer assigned to notify family members when their loved ones have been killed in action.”
 
 

A POW Tail

William "Bill" Giambrone was shot down over Romania on his 25th mission and captured. When Romania switched sides they told all the POWs to leave.
 
 
 

Fred Fiske and the Castle Mission of 27 September 1944

 
Fred is a radio commentator in Washington at station WAMU – and in 1944 he was a radio operator in a B-24. In 6 minutes 31 of 34 B-24s in his combat group were shot down by Fw-190s.
 
 

Last Reunion of the 780 BG (H)

Two members of the 780th get together for the last reunion in Abilene. The 780th flew out of Italy as part of the 15th Air Force.
 
 
 

39th FS Reunion in Bellingham

Stationed in Bellingham at the start of WW II to patrol the West Coast , later on members were assigned to various units throughout the military as time wore on and the unit itself was sent to the 5th Air Force in the South Pacific flying P-38s.
 
 

B-29 Missions over Japan – At night

Chuck Chauncey flew a B-29 named "Goin' Jessie" out of Tinian for 35 missions. Plane # 704.
 
 
 

Pratt & Whitney Donates Engine to WW II Museum

A P&W Twin Wasp R-1830-90D will be donated to the National WW II Museum in New Orleans. It will eventually end up in a Chance-Vought F4U Corsair.
 
 

USS Nevada Ships’ Bell again Owned by Nevada

It was given to the local Kiwanis Club of Las Vegas by Senator Pat McCarran in 1950.
It will be placed into the Nevada State Museum in Carson City. [Likely never to be rung or touched ever again. Editor]
 
 

A Destroyer Named “Spruance”

On October 1, 2011 the US Navy will commission DDG 111, an Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Cruiser, The USS Spruance.
 
 

Rebuilding a C-47 “Gooney Bird” in Florida

At Zephyrhills Municipal Airport they are starting to rebuild a C-47 transport (British name “Dakota”) they have the large assemblies of the C-47 and are working to assemble it into a complete machine – but major pieces are missing: doors, propellers, engines and flaps.
 
 

Weather Missions and the Bombing Campaign in Europe

 
Weather forecasting was precarious during WW II – limited data and lots of guessing was the rule in deciding what target would be attacked the next day.
 
One of the ways to solve that was to have a dedicated weather scouting force recon the route and report back the weather conditions on the day of the mission.
 
Spirit of Flight Center air museum, located at the Erie, CO Municipal airport,  honored Capt. Bill Getz with a ceremony and induction of a giant ¼ scale P-51 Mustang which is painted in the colors of his P-51 Mustang : “Saucy Shirley”.
 
 

C-47 Arrives in Portland – Tennessee

 
Flown to Portland, the wings were removed and it was hauled through the city to its new home: Days Gone By Tractor and Antique Museum.
 
"You don't see a DC-3 coming down Highway 52 everyday that is for sure," Portland resident Terry Durham said.
 
 
 
 

A Ferry Pilot Then a Transport Pilot

Robert Haswell started out in the Navy, then an aircraft mechanic, then a pilot. He ended up flying “The Hump” in the CBI (China, Burma, India) Theater.

 
 
 

New Aces of Aces for Canada

Billy Bishop (72 planes shot down)  is about to share the top spot with Colonel William G. Barker, VC. Barker is credited with 50 enemy planes shot down.
 
In WW I in order to confirm a plane was shot down it normally had to be seen by ground forces on found on the Allied side of the lines.
 
 

1991 Gulf War POW Stories

 
This is a reprint article from before the 2003 Iraqi War.
22 Americans were captured in the First Gulf War, 20 by being shot down and two on the ground.
 
 

The Star salutes our Women of Steel: The girls who kept the foundry fires burning

A book about the women working in the steel works in Yorkshire, UK during the war.
 
 

Ground Broken For Memorial of a 1952 Crash Near Larson Air Base

 
In 1952 a C-124A Globemaster crashed after taking off from Larson Air Base (Moses Lake) killing 87 servicemen. Now a memorial is being built upon the site.
 
 

Finback Crewman who helped save George H W Bush in 1944

 
Alerted to a plane being shot down the USS Finback rescued LT JG Bush near Japanese held islands. After becoming president Christmas cards started to arrive.
 
“His proudest possession was a large certificate signed by Bush and honoring him and his crewmates on Bush's inauguration day in January 1989. It said: "With Grateful Appreciation, Vernon Marvin Barrington, 10th War Patrol, Crew of USS Finback SS230." “
 
 

Bolt Buyer of the Boeing Bee

Velva Maye was a purchasing agent for Boeing starting in 1942 and the B-17F Flying Fortress “Boeing Bee”, now completely restored, rolled out of the factory on February 13, 1943. So the bolts she bought are in there somewhere.
 
 

Andy Rooney Retires – Flew as a War Correspondent in the 8th AF

Long known for his commentary on 60 Minutes, he was one of the few newspaper people authorized to fly combat missions in the early part of the war. All of them also went to gunnery training on the waist guns before going on a mission.
 
He was one of six correspondents flew on the first 8th AF B-17 bombing mission into Germany on 27 January 1943 to Wilhelmshaven navy base. This was 8th AF Mission 31 which dispatched 64 B-17s and 27 B-24s. 1 B-17 and 2 B-24s are shot down. The only war correspondent who flew with the B-24s was killed when the B-24 he was in was shot down.
 

Stars and Stripes Celebrates 150 years of publication

The annual reunions first started in 1989 and are held in various locations. http://www.semissourian.com/story/1766717.html
 
A memorial plaque was placed where it is thought the very first one was produced. http://www.dailystatesman.com/story/1767514.html
 
 

Calling in Artillery onto Yourself

Major Tony Eeles was in a precarious situation: the enemy had infiltrated the lines around his position at the Salerno beachhead – so he called in artillery onto his own position.
 
“He saw action in Greece towards the end of the war and subsequently trained as a pilot, flying Austers. A report noted that he was “over-confident to a dangerous degree” and he was encouraged to employ his talents elsewhere.”
 
 

Soviet Storm - WW2 in The East

Is a TV show that is being shown in the UK. It uses Russian archival film to show the war in the USSR from their perspective. Unknown if it will be shown in the USA or elsewhere.
 
 
 

War And Peace – the Soviet made movie of the 1812 Invasion

Made by Sergei Bondarchuk for around $100 million (in the 1950s) it had a cast of around 100,000.
 
Find the DVD with Russian dialog with English subtitles – and a weekend. It is over 6 hours long.
 
 

449 BG (H) Reunion Held in Reno in September

Likely for the last time this Bomb Group which was part of the 15th Air Force based in Italy held a reunion. 41 combat veterans attended.
 
The 449th is in the process of doing a video history and has completed video interviews with 65 members of the unit so far. Copies have been sent to the Smithsonian Oral History Project.
 
 

The Sandborn Brothers – Stan and Glenn

 
Stan was drafted in 1944 and reported to Fort Snelling. “Stan and his fellow soldiers lined up and, one by one, were told where they would be sent. It was a regular rotation — Army, Navy, Air Corps, Marine, Coast Guard and then back to Army.” He was then selected to be put into the Army Air Forces and spent months training to repair aircraft.
 
 
 

A Short History of the 11 BG (H) – “Grey Geese”

This was the unit that was stationed at Hickam Field on December 7, 1941. The famous picture of a burned out B-17 is one of theirs.
 
 

Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame

 
14 Comanche “Code Talkers”, B-17 Pilot 1st Lt Donald J Gott (MOH), Major Fed A Hancock (C Company, 1st Battalion, 502nd PIR, 101 Airborne) and others were inducted into the Oklahoma Military Hall of Fame in September of 2011.
 
No one knows where the Hall of Fame is really located since none of the news articles or reporters mentioned the location – only where it took place and who was inducted.
 
 

Six into the Delaware Aviation Hall of Fame

A P-51, B-25, two Helicopter pilots, a space shuttle crew member and an instructor were put onto this honor roll.
 
Like the above HOF in Oklahoma, no one knows where the Hall Of Fame is located when writing the article but there is a web site for the Delaware version:  http://www.dahf.org/ - but web site has no idea where it is located either.
 
 

Only 1 Off

George William Cannon, Jr. died in September in Florida. You would have heard of him more if he had been assigned a different boat. He commanded PT-108 in the South Pacific.
 
 
Other PT Boat Veterans who died recently can be found at:
 
 

A Nurse in The South Pacific – and lots of other Places

Min Coburn decorates her place in McMinnville Oregon with items she has collected from around the world and especially items from The South Pacific.
 
Having served in the Pacific shortly after the wary she went back in the late 1980s and visited Pacific sites where American military forces had fought during World War II. She went "the full circle," stopping in New Zealand, Tahiti, the Philippines, Bali, Samoa, Guadalcanal, New Caledonia and many other islands with names from history books.
 
"In the Solomons, we met a man with his own World War II museum.  When he found out we were from America, he got down on his knees and kissed our feet and said, 'Thank you, thank you, thank you.' "
 
 

Recovering the Honolulu Clipper

It sank in 1945 north of Hawaii in 18,000 feet of water – and now a firm wants to try and raise it up.
 
The B-314 had 22 square feet per passenger, compared with 6 feet per passenger in coach seats in commercial jets today, according to the UAS team.
 
 

Escaping Germany and Spying for Germany at the same Time

Walther Rauff left Germany at the end of World War Two due to him being a very high ranking NAZI SS security officer and went to South America – where he was then recruited to work for Germany’s version of the CIA – the BND. But he was not a fugitive or wanted for any possible crimes till his name came up in the trial of Adolph Eichmann in 1962.
 
 
 

North Sea Battleground: The War at Sea 1914-18

A new book out about the battles fought between England and Germany over this stretch of ocean was published in England.
 
On December 16, 1914 the first German warships started shelling Harlepool and thus began 4 years of intermittent naval surface warfare.
 
Published by Pen & Sword has a hardback cover price of £19.99. ISBN 184884450-6. www.pen-and-sword.co.uk
 
 
 
 

Touring France and Germany as a Foot Soldier

Drafed in July of 1942 he never got to a combat unit until August of 1944 when “Operation Anvil” began – which was the invasion of France along its southern coast.
 
He was stationed for a few months at Fort Des Moines: “There were 10,000 women there and 250 men. That was something.”
 
 

Max Hastings’ book “All Hell Let Loose” Published

 
A global look at World War II with more emphasis on the foot soldier but also looking at the abilities of the Generals of all sides on how they performed given the knowledge and equipment they had.
 
“While 17,000 American combat casualties lost limbs, during the war years 100,000 workers became amputees as a result of industrial accidents.”
 
All Hell Let Loose: The World at War 1939-1945, by Max Hastings, HarperPress, RRP £30, 748 pages
 
 
 

Alconbury – Only Birds will be Flying There Soon

Shut down as an airport in 1995, parts of Alconbury will be turned into a housing and enterprise zone.

During WW II it was known as Station 102 and was home to the 92, 93, 95, 482, and 801 Bomb Groups at one time or another.
 
 

A Secret Wartime Diary by a Mid-Level German Bureaucrat

 
August Friedrich Kellner of Lauback Germany started a diary on 1 September 1939 when Germany invaded Poland. Throughout the war he made entries into it about what he saw, what he knew through his work, and had been told by others.
 
His grandson, Robert Scott Kellner was born and raised in the USA, had known about his grandparents lived in Germany but that was all. After finding him while in transit from one duty station to another in Germany, he was given the 10 volume diary before his grandparents died and published it in July of 2011.
 
 
 

Oregon Chapter News, Archive Loan / Donation, and Contact Information

Next Oregon Chapter Meeting November 5, 2011

Send Stories and documents to be Borrowed / Archived

If you have items that you wish to share with others, they can be loaned to the Oregon Chapter, scanned and catalogued and then returned to you. You can always donate them permanently to the chapter if you wish. Contact Tom Philo to make arrangements for the documents.
 
Items in the archive are usually be posted onto the web site (see release form on web site) so that everyone can learn from what others have experienced.

Need a Ride to the Meeting?

There are many members who can no longer drive due to age so we are trying to find out those who are in need of transportation so that we can find other members who live nearby who can pick you up and then take you home afterwards.
 
If you would like to come to the meeting and need a ride please contact any chapter officer or board member and let them know.
Tom Davis, Bob Dean, Tom Philo, Sharon Campbell, Charlie Gallagher, Wally Groce, Bob Schuberg, Jerry Ritter, Joani Hamilton, Bert Campbell, Warren Caldwell, or Don Bourgeois. Via e-mail you can send the request to secretary@8thafhsorgeon.com if you do not have the phone numbers for the people listed above.
 

Oregon Chapter 8th AFHS

If you wish to be removed from the e-mail list please let us know.
 
Secretary 8th AFHS of Oregon
Tom Philo
17502 SW Kimmel Ct
Beaverton, Oregon 97007-6877
 
 
The Oregon Chapter is a registered Non-Profit 503(c) with the IRS and within the State of Oregon.
 
     

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